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in the Raj is the best-known example of this phenomenon. 7 Yet there were many others. ‘Secret’ Malay performances, usually performed in the dead of night, and Zulu ‘war dances’ were performed for Prince Alfred during his tour to South Africa in 1860. 8 Broken chiefs and handpicked rajas were trotted out as symbols of imperial progress and supremacy. The unknown and

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
West Indian intellectual

respectability in ways other than her colonial origins. Becoming a chorus girl symbolised a downward step, a move into one of those professions, like acting or dancing, which at that period were always suspected of sexual laxity. Chorus girls were largely working class, and could perhaps be acceptable as such. As Mrs Wilson, the suspicious interrogator in ‘Outside the machine’, says of a working-class chorus

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Global Britishness and settler cultures in South Africa and New Zealand

administrators to nurture an imperial culture but also by local social elites to justify and promote class cohesion and social order. While local elites gave particular meanings to the royal tours through the settler press, for many settlers, imperial rituals offered an opportunity to let loose, ‘to dance until midnight and drink till morning’. 43 The ‘Hermit of Adderley-Street’ reported, during Alfred’s 1860

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples

would promote the Inuit’s sense of belonging to Canada. In 1962, Mrs Robinson, as national president of the IODE, visited the Arctic for two weeks and opened the Tuktoyaktuk hall. On her return, she told the Toronto Star : ‘The hall has been given outright to the people up there. They can use it for their dances, for the showing of films, for anything they like.’ 35 The

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
The predicament of history

activity, despite the magnitude of the great migration from the Caribbean. No cafés or book or record shops or dance halls carry commemorative plaques, or retain a place in the larger collective memory. 1 Even educated opinion can still profess a certain puzzlement that there could be such a thing as an intellectual tradition deriving from the experience of the Caribbean, testament to the

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)

veterans of the War in Afghanistan, and were entertained by an aboriginal dance put on by First Canadians. They encountered cheering crowds and were heckled by Quebecois separatists. The young royals, particularly the label and style of the duchess’s clothing, enraptured the press in Canada and Britain. Royal onlookers across the globe, continuing their observations from the April wedding at Westminster

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)

with lumps of woolly hair on end upwards and sideways, brandishing their spears and curved sticks used as shields and clubs, dancing madly behind the retreating square looked through the smoke like real demons.’ 52 Several officers, including Scott-Stevenson and Graham, also recognised the tactical finesse of these warriors – their ability to use the ground and the cover of smoke to creep up close

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45

: It’s still on Prince William Street, and that’s where the seamen would come in during the war when they were on leave or had a break from their ship; and the IODE entertained almost every night of the week during the war, with dances, and serving refreshments, coffee. For years we made socks and things that they would need on board ship, heavy mittens

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Crossing the seas

origin in the drama of nascent nationhood, and that pride encompasses not only the creativeness, uniqueness and originality of West Indian mime, song and dance – but is the genesis of the nation itself.’ 51 ‘The drama of nascent nationhood’ was clearly active in Claudia Jones’s imagination. But her commitments to the West Indies were mediated through an almost lifelong absence. She had

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain

uncommonly fine sensibilities. Intensely alive, McKay loved music, he loved to dance and to swim. His love poems are as passionate as those of revolt. Friends recall his gift of laughter and mischievous sense of humour. It is precisely because of all this that he hated a civilisation that exploited, excluded and humiliated. His anger reached boiling point when this basic right to what the Spirituals call ‘the tree of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain