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Christine E. Hallett

Chirurgical Mobile No. 1.23 In June 1915, La Motte found herself under bombardment at Dunkirk whilst en route from Paris to Rousbrugge. She decided to ‘kill time’ by writing an account of her experiences for the popular American journal The Atlantic Monthly. Her writing is vivid and 79 Independent ladies immediate; she informs the reader that she is describing events as they unfold, in an attempt to calm her nerves, adding that ‘as each shell strikes I  spring back to the window, and my chair falls backwards, while the others laugh’.24 Her article was published five

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Christine E. Hallett

episode as if it were part of an adventure story is striking, and is typical of this genre of war writing.18 Following the German occupation, Millicent and her party were escorted on foot to Brussels – a long and difficult journey; but Millicent claims to have shrugged it off as no further than she might walk ‘in a day’s golfing’. From Brussels they returned home by car and boat via Rotterdam.19 32 Heroines in Belgium and Serbia By 23 October, Millicent was back on the Continent. The ‘Millicent Sutherland Ambulance Car Convoy’ landed in Dunkirk and established a 100

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Jane Brooks

-­ward dressing round its ritual. Nurses needed to develop more reactive nursing skills rapidly. Morris’s experiences as a student following the evacuation of soldiers from Dunkirk were to provide excellent training for her overseas postings: As I entered the Casualty department, I was astounded to see so many wet, dirty and injured people there. Some were soldiers (I guessed they must be Dunkirk survivors), others were civilians … they were all laid out on stretchers on the floor, and most of our surgeons and physicians were there, assisted by several senior Sisters and Staff

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Nursing work and nurses’ space in the Second World War: a gendered construction
Jane Brooks

Slater did her tropical diseases training in order to go on active service overseas, but again the war ended and, she said, ‘life just took a different course’.72 Many research participants were able to remember vividly certain aspects of wartime nursing, especially caring for soldiers in the aftermath of the evacuation from Dunkirk in the late spring of 1940 and the Normandy landings four years later. These memories are framed within what Lynn Abrams refers to as episodic ­memories – ­that is, those memories that enable the participant to recall not only an event but

in Negotiating nursing
Christine E. Hallett

entertaining in the capital.34 When Britain entered the First World War in August 1914, Borden was pregnant with her third daughter, Mary. She volunteered her 53 Independent ladies services to the London Committee of the French Red Cross, and, soon after Mary’s birth, travelled to Malo-les-Bains near Dunkirk to nurse typhoid patients. Her first posting was to a makeshift hospital in a converted casino and she was appalled by its lack of equipment and trained staff. She herself had undergone no formal nurse training at all and was obliged to learn from better experienced

in Nurse Writers of the Great War