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Rumours of bones and the remembrance of an exterminated people in Newfoundland - the emotive immateriality of human remains
John Harries

See F. Stepputat (ed.), Governing the Dead:  Sovereignty and the Politics of Dead Bodies (Manchester:  Manchester University Press, 2014); K. Verdery, The Political Lives of Dead Bodies:  Reburial and Postsocialist Change (New York: Columbia University Press, 1999). 2 See Verdery, The Political Lives of Dead Bodies, pp.  27–​9; H. Williams, ‘Death warmed up: the agency of bodies and bones in Early Anglo-​Saxon cremation rites’, Journal of Material Culture, 9:3 (2004), 263–​91. 3 See L. Renshaw, ‘Missing bodies near at hand: the dissonant memory and dormant graves

in Human remains in society
The afterlives of human remains at the Bełzec extermination camp
Zuzanna Dziuban

–​92. 11 By taking the tooth from the site of the former camp, Lea Rosh to some extent violated the legally binding and commonly accepted rule according to which ‘no “property interest” exists in a dead body’. Essentially, a body is irreducible to and should not become a private possession of another individual. 12 D. Posel and P. Gupta, ‘The life of the corpse: framing reflections and questions’, African Studies, 68 (2009), 299. 13 See H. Williams, ‘Death warmed up: the agency of bodies and bones in early Anglo Saxon cremation rites’, Journal of Material Culture, 9

in Human remains in society