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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott

) Despite Strongbow's evident longing for his own age, the novel elsewhere shows a confirmed resignation to the passage of time. In particular, Strongbow's invasion of Ireland is depicted as a necessary and beneficial step that benefited both Ireland and Britain as a whole: ‘Accompanying Strongbow's polemic against [modern] luxury and corruption’, Watt argues, ‘is a myth of manifest destiny which promotes Ireland's role as “an invaluable portion of the British Empire!” ’ 70 White ultimately refrains from denouncing Strongbow

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction

of ‘sentiment and power’ in that novel's twinned discourses on sensibility and colonial politics. 103 The heroine's choice of Clarence Hervey over the Creole planter Mr Vincent, Connolly argues, relies not only on her beliefs about ‘first love’ but also on her discovery of his lack of feeling in his treatment of his servant, Juba. 104 Rejecting Mr Vincent, Belinda registers her disdain for ‘the disgraceful extensions of sympathy characteristic of its mobilization within discourses of empire’. 105 She also effectively asserts her preference for her home in

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Female sexual agency and male victims

: Maternity, Sexuality and Empire in Eighteenth Century English Narrative (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995) and Ruth Perry, Novel Relations: The Transformation of Kinship in English Literature and Culture 1748–1818 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004). 22 E. J. Clery

in Gothic incest
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Location the Irish gothic novel

. 180. 13 Martyn J. Powell, Britain and Ireland in the eighteenth-century crisis of empire (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003), p. 164. 14 Killeen, Gothic Ireland , p. 54. 15

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange

. Nussbaum, Torrid Zones: Maternity, Sexuality, and Empire in Eighteenth-Century English Narratives (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995), pp. 22–46. 57 Nussbaum points to this association of the domestic female servant with sexuality (pp. 25–6). 58

in Gothic incest