Cricket, Canada and the Caribbean diaspora
Author: Janelle Joseph

This book outlines the ways in which sport helps to create transnational social fields that interconnect migrants dispersed across a region known as the Black Atlantic: England, North America and the Caribbean. Many Caribbean men’s stories about their experiences migrating to Canada, settling in Toronto’s urban and suburban neighbourhoods, finding jobs, returning home for visits, and traveling to other diasporic locations involved some contact with a cricket and social club. The cricket ground brings black Canadians together as a unified community, not only to celebrate their homeland cultures or assuage the pain of the “racial terror” that unifies the Black Atlantic, but also to allay the pain of aging in the diaspora. Players and spectators corporeal practices, post-game activities, sport-related travel, as well as music, food, meetings, fundraisers, parties, and shared stories are analysed in this text as resources deployed to maintain the Black Atlantic, that is, to create deterritorialized communities and racial identities; A close look at what goes on before, during, and after cricket matches provides insights into the contradictions and complexities of Afro-diasporic identity performances, the simultaneous representation of sameness and difference among Afro-Caribbean, African-American, Black British, Indo-Caribbean and South-Asian groups in Canada. This book describes twenty-one months of ethnographic empirical evidence of how black identities are gendered, age-dependent and formed relationally, with boundary making (and crossing) as an active process in multicultural Canada.

Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

white and black teams against each other, naming them The West (England and Australia) and The Rest. The Mavericks, a group of Antiguan-, Barbadian-, Grenadian, Guyanese-, Jamaican- and Trinidadian-Canadians joined Trinidadian and Jamaican nationals to celebrate unity and pride in black masculine sporting prowess, exerting a unified black identity despite their varied Caribbean origins and current

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
South Africa in the post-imperial metropole
Laura Chrisman

chapter6 21/12/04 11:17 am Page 107 6 Transnational productions of Englishness: South Africa in the post-imperial metropole ‘Huge ideological work has to go on every day to produce this mouse that people can recognize as the English.’ Thus observes Stuart Hall, one of the foremost practitioners of black cultural studies in Britain.1 For Hall, the transformation of English national identity began with Margaret Thatcher’s 1979 government. The contemporary production of Englishness became, and continues to be, labour-intensive because England had lost the

in Postcolonial contraventions
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

, England, the United States and the Caribbean. This book is also concerned with the cultural flows and mobility within the Afro-Caribbean diaspora. As emigrant populations outnumber those who remain at home in Caribbean territories and islands, and as ethnic and national conversations, creolisations and oppressions influence black consciousness, more attention must be paid to the ways in which race

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

, transnational social networks and performances of nation and masculinity, to name but a few themes covered in this text. The Caribbean diaspora is a diverse, deterritorialised community. Not only in terms of their present locations (e.g., Ohio and Georgia in the United States, London and Birmingham in England, Toronto and Montreal in Canada), but also in terms of the diversity in

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Jane Humphries

clustered around the southern shores of the North Sea, Flanders, Brabant,  Holland and England, embarked on slow but continuous and relatively  reversal-free growth over many centuries, leaving behind an economically stagnant and prone-to-setbacks south and east, exemplified by the once-dominant Italy but including Spain and Portugal and the countries of  eastern Europe (Broadberry et al., 2015). The relationship between the household and the economy and women’s role within both is crucial to this new account  of  how the west got rich, and its study illustrates once

in Making work more equal
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

real name. When he heard someone in England calling for “Old Dog Tom,” he knew it must be someone who knew him from his younger days. At the collegiate they had started calling him Elquemedo after the famous spin bowler, and after that he was known as Shakey, which was related to a particularly boisterous night at the dancehall

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

Britain. 1 This chapter explores the slow process of dismantling the British system of routine smallpox vaccination of infants. A procedure that had been made compulsory in England and Wales in 1853 was discontinued in 1971. The chief reason for the end of smallpox vaccination was fairly obvious. The disease had been all but eradicated, and had ceased to be endemic in the United Kingdom since the 1930s. 2 But the timing of this decision was by no means inevitable. Full, worldwide eradication was not declared until 1980, and occasional outbreaks of the disease from

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

When the National Health Service Acts were passed in 1946 and 1947, two vaccines were part of the routine infant vaccination schedule. By 2018 these had increased to seventeen. 1 Ninety-four per cent of children received the pentavalent diphtheria-tetanus-acellular-pertussis, poliomyelitis and haemophilus influenza type b vaccine before their first birthdays in England and Wales in 2014–15. 2 Polio is no longer endemic in Britain and has nearly been eradicated worldwide. There were 18,596 notifications of diphtheria in England and Wales in

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

rubella were serious diseases, the immunisation rates against all three dropped nowhere near as significantly as pertussis had done in the 1970s. 4 Instead, British parents appeared to be unsure about what to do for their children at the turn of the millennium. Despite the popular conception of British parents during the MMR crisis, they were not, for the most part, anti-vaccine. 5 Average uptake of MMR in England fell from 91.8 per cent in 1996 to 79.9 per cent in 2004; but it dropped below 80 per cent in only three English regions, and rates remained robust

in Vaccinating Britain