Search results

The restructuring of work in Britain

poor’ (Hobsbawm, 1964; Middlemas, 1979; Gospel and Palmer, 1983). The excluded workers organised their interests in more politically oriented general unions, representing workers from across different industries. This divisive and internally competitive system established the organisation of workers’ interests at a subsector craft level, and at a transsector general level, but mitigated against the emergence of industrial unions such as those characteristic of continental Europe (Visser, 1995; Fulcher, 1991; Heise, 1997). The combined effects of the historical

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Unheard voices and invisible agency

140 and frightening’ (1995: 11), and the European Commission that ‘the reorganisation of work often causes uncertainty’ (CEC, 1997: 8). Yet, the overriding assumption is that the globalisation process is a given reality, essentially separate from the social and political restructuring that is undertaken in its name, and entirely independent of the everyday thoughts and actions of workers. Indeed, in the effort to construct a discourse of opportunity and manageability, such interventions represent the agency of workers as a problem to be overcome on the path to a

in Globalisation contested

will further facilitate geographical mobility. This in turn will enable workers to exploit their potential more fully and exercise their rights in this respect. (Commission of European Communities (CEC), 1997: 7) The European Commission positions the restructuring of work as a direct response to exogenous technological and market forces. Indeed, the flexibilisation of work is represented in terms of the opportunities and rewards of ‘upskilling’, training and greater labour market mobility. The discourse that has emerged and made flexibility ‘common sense’ for the

in Globalisation contested
The restructuring of work in Germany

_Global_05_Ch4 93 6/19/02, 12:22 PM Globalisation contested 94 and contested. The media, for example, simultaneously proclaim that ‘Tomorrow belongs to Germany’, and that ‘Germany is stalling’ (The Sunday Times and Evening Standard, cited in Marsh, 2000: 76). Indeed, the images of Germany as inflexible ‘laggard’ and innovative ‘leader’ have even shared the same headline: ‘The Sick Man of Europe Dances a Jig’ (The Guardian, 12 August 1998: 15). What are we to make of the competing images of ‘Modell Deutschland’1 within the globalisation debate? In this chapter I argue

in Globalisation contested

steroids. Ed had loaded a video called 2008: A Year of Edits. Produced by ITO World, a data visualisation supplier which, in common with CloudMade, has a quasisponsoring relationship with OSM, the video shows a spinning globe set against the pulsating sound track as lines flash across parts of the planet, each flash animating a newly generated addition or edit to the OSM map during 2008. The brightest and most intense flashes occur where one might expect them to occur, in Europe and North America, but there are not many places left on the planet where the odd trace has

in Time for mapping
The case for practice theory

community participation. Doctoral Dissertation, The University of Sheffield. Goodchild, M. (2006) Commentary: GIScience ten years after Ground Truth. Transactions in GIS, 10(5): pp. 687–692. Harley, B. J. (1987) ‘The map and the development of the history of cartography’. In: Harley, B. and Woodward, D. (eds) The History of Cartography: Volume 1: Cartography in Prehistoric, Ancient, and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean. London: University of Chicago Press, pp. 1–42. Harley, B. J. (1988a) ‘Maps, knowledge, power’. In: Laxton, P. (ed.) The New Nature of Maps: Essays in

in Time for mapping
Considerations and consequences

traces a vast road network across the known world, from Rome itself through large sections of Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia (see Figure 8.1). The extent to which this document Mapping the space of flows 177 Figure 8.1  Unknown author, Tabula Peutingeriana, c. fourth–fifth centuries. Conradi Millieri / Wikimedia / public domain. might ­actually be considered a true map is contested, given the common suggestion that it is just a diagram of a route network visualising a pre-existing itinerary listing destinations along these roads.2 But Richard Talbert

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)

Relations Survey reports that 47 per cent of firms located in Britain had no union members, a figure that has increased from 36 per cent in the 1990 survey (Cully et al., 1998). The number of part-time workers grew by 5.4 per cent over 1999 to total 24.9 per cent of total employment (European Industrial Relations Observatory (EIRO), 1999). Ninety per cent of British firms use subcontracting, 44 per cent use fixed-term contracts and 28 per cent use agency workers (EIRO, 1999). Figures for Germany show that trade unions lost 30 per cent of their membership between 1991 and

in Globalisation contested
Art and the temporalities of geomedia

used by the clients of sex workers and used Street View to source images of them, mainly urban edgeland sites in southern Europe (Henner, 2011; 2012). Many of these images show the moment when the sex workers – all women – look up to address the photographic apparatus, their faces pixelated by Google’s pattern recognition algorithm. However, the most poignant of the No Man’s Land images capture these scenes at those times when they are empty of human subjects: Henner bookends the first volume with images that show only chairs by the roadside. In a recent analysis of

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)

Europe, the logic of preparedness in the US focuses on the early detection of emergence of diseases and the mitigation of effects. In shifting attention from the surveillance of people to the surveillance of diseases under the regime of pathogen preparedness, Fearnley (2005: 2) locates the development of a system of ‘syndromic surveillance’. This system aims to identify correlations between different data sources, such as: the records of emergency room patients’ symptoms, the sales of pharmaceuticals, and registers of emergency calls. By continuously comparing data

in Time for mapping