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Author: Christina Morin

The gothic novel in Ireland, 1760–1830 offers a compelling account of the development of gothic literature in late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century Ireland. Against traditional scholarly understandings of Irish gothic fiction as a largely late-nineteenth century development, this study recovers to view a whole body of Irish literary production too often overlooked today. Its robust examination of primary texts, the contexts in which they were produced, and the critical perspectives from which they have been analysed yields a rigorous account of the largely retrospective formal and generic classifications that have worked to eliminate eighteenth-century and Romantic-era Irish fiction from the history of gothic literature. The works assessed here powerfully demonstrate that what we now understand as typical of ‘the gothic novel’– medieval, Catholic Continental settings; supernatural figures and events; an interest in the assertion of British modernity – is not necessarily what eighteenth- and nineteenth-century readers or writers would have identified as ‘gothic’. They moreover point to the manner in which scholarly focus on the national tale and allied genres has effected an erasure of the continued production and influence of gothic literature in Romantic Ireland. Combining quantitative analysis with meticulous qualitative readings of a selection of representative texts, this book sketches a new formal, generic, and ideological map of gothic literary production in this period. As it does so, it persuasively positions Irish works and authors at the centre of a newly understood paradigm of the development of the literary gothic across Ireland, Britain, and Europe between 1760 and 1830.

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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

throughout Europe, William Delamere returns to Ireland considerably wealthier, materially and experientially, than when he left. There, literally and metaphorically enriched by his travels, he marries his childhood sweetheart, Grace O’Neil, restoring her family to the status and prosperity denied to them by a lengthy history of violent dispossession and metatextually reworking a similar union in Edgeworth's Ennui (1809). In that novel, Lord Glenthorn's marriage to Cecilia Delamere and assumption of his wife's name is a symbolic act of rebirth that both reinvests him

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Location the Irish gothic novel
Christina Morin

than what allows us to account for the impact of changing and evolving temporal and cultural conditions in this period. It eliminates the single-minded focus on the novel as the principal gothic literary vehicle, accounting for the intrinsic generic instability of the Romantic period. 36 It takes into consideration both conservative and subversive viewpoints, both fear-inducing and farcical tones and moods, both overtly supernatural and more mundane characters and events. And it helps to integrate Irish writers into a wider British and European gothic literary

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Christina Morin

fiction that accurately situates it formally, generically, narratologically, ideologically, and geographically within the contexts of Irish, British, and European literary output. Alongside the more traditional qualitative analysis included here, these ‘graphs, maps, and trees’ provide an innovative and transformative account of Irish gothic fiction that not only reframes scholarship of ‘the Gothic novel’ and ‘Irish Gothic’ but also reworks conventional perceptions of the literary gothic's place within and impact upon Romantic-era culture. At the same time, in keeping

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

almost essential to the genre’. 8 Yet, closer examination of Radcliffe's oeuvre reveals that even she was not as attached to Catholic Continental settings as we now tend to think. In fact, Radcliffe's earliest novel The castles of Athlin and Dunbayne (1789) shuns a medieval Catholic European setting in favour of the sublime scenery of contemporary Scotland. If this gestures towards the equation of the so-called ‘Celtic Fringe’ with a barbarity equally terrifying, if not more so, than that of the Catholic Continent, it also refers back to the local, English

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

rational disbelief to the same irrational and superstitious ideas for which it condemned Otranto : enlightenment understanding, it proposed, necessarily acts as ‘a charm’ to ward off ‘infatuation’. The Monthly Review 's striking combination of superstition and empirical scepticism in this instance evidences, in Diane Long Hoeveler's phrase, ‘the rise of ambivalent secularization’ in the latter half of the eighteenth century. 30 The literary gothic, for Hoeveler, is the product of the shift between religion-dominated early modern European society to more secular, less

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

Journal of Medical Psychology , 68:1 (1995), 29–44; and Roland Littlewood, Pathologies of the West: An Anthropology of Mental Illness in Europe and America (London: Continuum, 2002). 16 Tamas Bereczkei, Petra Gyuris and Glenn E Weisfeld, ‘Sexual imprinting in human mate choice’, Proceedings

in Gothic incest
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Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

a sense of obligation to her uncle. Emmeline discusses Augusta’s family members as if they are exclusive of her own, rather than her kin too. Her aunt also accuses Emmeline of non-kinship, telling her: ‘“you would like to hide your own obscurity in the brilliant pedigree of one of the first families in Europe. But know, presumptuous girl, that the whole house shall perish e’re it shall thus be

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

of Mental Illness in Europe and America (London: Continuum, 2002). Lynn Åkesson’s ‘Bound by Blood? New Meanings of Kinship and Individuality in Discourses of Genetic Counseling’, in Linda Stone (ed.), New Directions in Anthropological Kinship (Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield, 2001), pp. 125–36, reveals the influence of modern scientific advances on understanding incestuous

in Gothic incest