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Sustainability, the arts and the watermill
Jayne Elisabeth Archer, Howard Thomas, and Richard Marggraf Turley

Spanish Armada, Faire Em celebrates the miller as representative of Englishness itself, and it is perhaps no coincidence that to Elizabethans, France was notorious for the poor quality of its cereal crops and bread.5 By the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, literary portrayals of the watermill assume an elegiac tone, whether in the tragi-comedies of George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss (2010, first published 1860) and Thomas Hardy’s The Trumpet Major (1880), or the maudlin poetry of Robert Bloomfield.6 Alfred Lord Tennyson’s ‘The Miller’s Daughter

in Literature and sustainability
Sara Haslam

know, the abyss often used to describe modernist sensibilities (think of the catastrophist analyses of modernism detailed in the Introduction to this book). Doctrine I: the novel The first, greatest and most conclusive aspect of Ford’s doctrine is the generic form of the novel itself.16 Not, most immediately, the kind of novel that George Eliot and Charles Dickens used to write, for obvious reasons to do with omniscience and the nature of the modernist quest: in modernist novels, characters are not presented ‘whole’, but ‘in the fragmentary way in which people appear

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

six of these “hundred thousands”’ (Face of Battle, pp. 174, 217). But despite the fact that Wilson discusses Kitchener as a ‘symbol of the Government’s determination to prosecute the war to victory’, he thinks the famous poster did little in the way of persuading men to enlist (Myriad Faces of War, pp. 243, 409–10). Hence Ford’s sense, as well as his language, is evocative of George Eliot’s ‘roar which lies on the other side of silence’ that she claims one could die of (Middlemarch, Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1985, p. 226). He writes typically, in a way that further

in Fragmenting modernism