Search results

Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

have developed particular strategies of looking which have flourished after abolition, Jim Crow, decolonisation, the civil rights era and diasporic migration. We can see these ways of looking as cracks, openings, alternatives that capture, renew and refuse the bordering of the domesticating state. Alternatives can be co-opted, or can replicate the terms of coloniality – such as local/global humanitarianism and compassionate nationalism – others provide for and recover more critical sensibilities and orientations. In this penultimate chapter, I examine three

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author:

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

exceptional contributor to humanity and nation. In parallel, this motivates the exceptional act of welcoming refugees 208 Bordering intimacy and migrants by European publics (Fiddian-Qasmiyeh 2018). Whilst expressively about welcoming and revelling in difference, these examples remain orientated towards both a global humanitarianism and a local ‘compassionate’ nationalism, which draws borders around who can be empathised with and who cannot, translated as who can contribute to and benefit the civilisation and/or the nation and who cannot. In this way, the reification and

in Bordering intimacy