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Jonathan Colman

, told Wilson on 18 November that ‘a precipitate appeal to the United States for direct help might prejudice next month’s talks in Washington’. 24 In his dealings with Congress, whose consent would be needed for a unilateral US Government loan to the British, Johnson gave priority to his ‘Great Society’ programme of social legislation. But the initial British economic measures did seem to strike the right note in the White

in A ‘special relationship’?
Open Access (free)
Ian Carter

of the self as wider than the individual and as represented by an organic social ‘whole’ – ‘a tribe, a race, a church, a state, the great society of the living and the dead and the yet unborn’. The ‘true’ interests of the individual are to be identified with the interests of this whole, and individuals can and should be coerced into fulfilling these interests, for they would not resist coercion if they were as rational and

in Political concepts
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Jonathan Colman

‘during the previous Labour Government when NATO and the Berlin blockade had been dealt with’. 68 Lyndon B. Johnson Not least because the 1960s was a period of social and political tumult, the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson has attracted the attention of numerous historians, most of whom tend to praise his success with regard to the ‘Great Society’ programme of civil rights, welfare and educational measures

in A ‘special relationship’?
Open Access (free)
Harold Wilson and Lyndon B. Johnson: a ‘special relationship’?
Jonathan Colman

this field, and, as Kennedy’s vice-president (1961–63), he made numerous trips abroad. However, with his vision of creating a ‘Great Society’ – helping to heal the racial divide and to eradicate poverty – the President was more interested in domestic politics than international affairs, and certainly had little commitment to close ties with London. As a Foreign Office analysis noted in May 1965, Johnson did not have ‘any

in A ‘special relationship’?
Jonathan Colman

their argument itself is balls’. 34 The vivid language did not mollify the President, who was deeply weary of the war in Vietnam. As Patrick Dean noted, he regarded the conflict as a ‘lamentable diversion of money and effort from the more worthwhile task of building the “Great Society”’. 35 Johnson sought Bruce’s opinion to try to understand the British dissociation. On 11 July, the Ambassador explained that as ‘a political animal, highly skilled

in A ‘special relationship’?