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Open Access (free)
Jonathan Colman

and the United States. 8 In their coverage of the relationship over first two post-war decades, most writers do tend to regard the adjective ‘special’ as at least partially warranted. The American academic and foreign policy practitioner Henry Kissinger, for example, notes how effectively British diplomats brought their influence to bear upon American policymakers. There were ‘meetings so regular that autonomous American

in A ‘special relationship’?
Jonathan Colman

exchanges before our statement was made’. 80 Wilson’s effort to establish a close relationship with Nixon enjoyed only limited success, because no real rapport ever emerged between the two leaders. For example, Wilson suggested after their first handshake that they should address each other by their first names. Nixon’s National Security Adviser, Henry Kissinger, noted that ‘A fishy-eyed stare from Nixon squelched this idea’. 81

in A ‘special relationship’?
Open Access (free)
Recovery and hubris; effervescence in the East
Kjell M. Torbiörn

materialise. The price hikes of the OPEC (Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries) oil cartel – termed ‘the moral equivalent of war’ by the then US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger – were more a healthy reminder to the industrialised countries that they could not go on wasting energy in the way they had been up until then. The truth of the adage ‘a barrel of oil saved is a barrel of oil produced’ began to sink in, leading to companies and individuals starting to economise on an asset previously taken as both cheap and inexhaustible – in the form of less energy

in Destination Europe
Open Access (free)
Kjell M. Torbiörn

limits their scope. (Henry Kissinger)1 Summary As the EU and NATO enlarge, prospects for overall economic growth and peace are good, even if tensions both within and without the enlarged circle of EU and NATO member states could cloud the picture, as over Iraq in 2003. Prospects for peace and prosperity improved in South-Eastern Europe under a Stability Pact for the region, involving major international assistance. Continuing EU and NATO enlargement will mean an eastward shift of Europe’s ‘centre of gravity’, with a major role for Germany. That country is, however

in Destination Europe