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Open Access (free)
Editor: Paul Grainge

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. The memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This book is a sustained, interdisciplinary perspective on memory and film from early cinema to the present. The first section examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory narratives in and around the production and consumption of American cinema. The second section examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. The book explores the articulation of Vietnam. The final section concentrates on the issue of mediation; it explores how technological and semiotic shifts in the cultural terrain have influenced the coding and experience of memory in contemporary cinema. It considers both the presence of music and colour in nostalgia films of the 1990s and the impact of digital and video technologies on the representational determinants of mediated memory. The book also examines the stakes of cultural remembering in the United States and the means by which memory has been figured through Hollywood cinema.

Open Access (free)
New retro movies in 1990s Hollywood cinema
Philip Drake

, memorialised past is increasingly dependent upon, and recycled within, audiovisual representations such as those found in popular film. My aim is to consider how 1990s Hollywood cinema has activated a selective, revised sense of the past, and how memory approaches to film history are able to analyse this. In particular, I will stress how popular cultural memory is drawn upon as an aesthetic and commercial strategy of Hollywood

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood
Julian Stringer

. The Thames Silent Classics series established a useful baseline for examining the revival of classic Hollywood cinema at the London festival for two key reasons. First, such revivals immediately created a sense of rarefied distinction by activating the displaced meaning strategy around, on the one hand, aesthetics factors, and on the other, ‘special’ modes of public presentation. In short, these

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

identity formation. Examining specific ‘memory work’ within contemporary Hollywood cinema, Part II explores the specificity of film in constituting memory narratives that can function in coercive ways but that can also, alternatively, hold the potential for progressive political understanding. The first two chapters concentrate on the former tendency. Considering cinematic articulations of the Vietnam War in Hollywood film

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

Kuhn, ‘Cinema-going in Britain in the 1930s: Report of a Questionnaire Survey’, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television , 19: 4 (1999), 531–43. 3 Jackie Stacey, Star Gazing, Hollywood Cinema and Female Spectator-ship (London: New York, Routledge, 1994

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Pence

’s posthistorical era. Hollywood quickly assimilated new procedures and styles into its repertoire – including computer imaging and animation, miniaturisation and digital developments in sound recording and amplification. This incorporation of video and electronic technologies into the core production processes and values of Hollywood cinema drives such second-generation products of the blockbuster strategy as

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

Knighthood: The Visual Aspects of Bill Clinton’s Camelot Legacy’ in Peter C. Rollins and John E. O’Connor (eds) Hollywood’s White House: The American Presidency in Film and History (Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 2003), p. 310. 36 Herman, ‘Bestowing Knighthood’, p. 311. 37 Terry Christensen and Peter J. Haas, Projecting Politics: Political Messages in American Films (Armonk, NY and London: M. E. Sharpe, 2005), p. 151. 38 Richard Maltby, Hollywood Cinema (Malden, MA and Oxford: Blackwell, 2nd edn, 2003), p. 289. 39 Richard D. Heffner, Oral History

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

: The Life and Murder of Alan Berg (New York: Beech Tree Books, 1987). 19 Don Kunz, ‘Oliver Stone’s Talk Radio’ in Don Kunz (ed), The Films of Oliver Stone (Lanham, MD and London: Scarecrow Press, 1997), pp.  150–​1. C or po ration s Notes 227 Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne 228 20 Norman Kagan, The Cinema of Oliver Stone (Oxford: Roundhouse, 1995), p. 144. 21 Kunz, ‘Oliver Stone’s Talk Radio’, pp. 150–​1. 22 Geoff King, New Hollywood Cinema: An Introduction (London and New York: I. B. Tauris, 2002), pp. 49–​85. 23 Terry Christensen and Peter J. Haas

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
The principles of Observational Cinema
Paul Henley

his manifesto-essay, Colin Young cites with approval the practice of the French New Wave feature film directors, who, having studied classic Hollywood cinema in order to identify the conventions whereby it achieved its effects, then used those same conventions themselves but in a more low-key way, leaving much more to the imagination of the audience. ‘They were not so much unconventional as restrained’, Young comments. ‘They left us space to fill and we participated.’ In his view, this was the goal towards which Observational Cinema film-makers should also be

in Beyond observation
Films of the Sensory Ethnography Lab
Paul Henley

, rush by in the background, in a manner that is weirdly reminiscent of the back projections in the car scenes of Hollywood cinema from the 1930s. On the soundtrack, the regular clattering sound as the car passes the pylons holding up the cables marks the passage of time within each journey in an intriguing metronomic fashion. The six upward journeys, including the goats’ journey, are presented in the first half of the film, one after another, followed by the five downward journeys in the second half. There is no break in the film between the

in Beyond observation