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The historian and the male witch
Lara Apps and Andrew Gow

of the Nazi holocaust in which everyone would agree that the majority of victims were Jewish, but no one would mention anti-Semitism or the history of violent persecution against Jews, thereby implying that it was ‘natural’ for Jews to be victims. Without mention of a tradition of oppression of women,the implication for the sixteenth century is that of course women would be

in Male witches in early modern Europe
S.J. Barnett

undoubtedly caused many to ask whether Jesus had ever intended Christian to fight Christian. The wars ended in 1648 with the Peace of Westphalia, by which time most rulers desired peace in which to recover from the protracted holocaust and reaffirm their rule. Thus historians have felt able to pronounce that the ‘Reformation age of astonishing religious development and upheaval, but also of religious darkness, was coming to a close’.14 This traditional explanation surrounding the nature and significance of the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century wars and conflicts, however

in The Enlightenment and religion
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The ‘defending democracy’ in Israel – a framework of analysis
Ami Pedahzur

inspiration of the writings of Dr Israel Eldad, one of the leaders of the Lehi, and the fierce demonstrations mounted by Etzel veterans against Ben-Gurion’s plan to accept compensation from Germany in place of Jewish property seized by the Nazis. Finally, there was the assassination of Dr Rudolph (Israel) Käsztner, a prominent leader of Hungarian Jewry at the time of the Holocaust. He was accused of befriending Nazis and turning in many members of his community in exchange for rescuing other Jews from their deadly grasp. 36 Käsztner’s murder was in effect the final

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
From the ‘militant’ to an ‘immunised’ route?
Ami Pedahzur

processes of political socialisation. Furthermore, in the aftermath of the exceptional history of the German Republic, the Holocaust and related issues such as tolerance and pluralism have become central topics in its education system. From a young age, children in Germany learn the advantages of democracy, as well as the potentially disastrous consequences should the basis of democracy be challenged or ignored. In terms of Germany’s institutional response to the challenges of extremism, there is now a marked inclination toward liberalisation in comparison to earlier

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
The parliamentary arena
Ami Pedahzur

extremist parties was not an easy one for the majority of MPs, some of them Holocaust survivors. They found it difficult to deal with Kahane’s actions – and with the notion that burgeoning within the Israeli legislature was a phenomenon that many tended to link to the darkest of political events of the twentieth century. The soul-searching shared by many members of the Israeli Parliament prior to the consolidation of the bill can be detected in the following statement, delivered by Moshe Nissim, the minister of justice: We introduce this law

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence