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Identity, heritage and creative research practice in Basilicata, southern Italy

Sonic ethnography explores the role of sound-making and listening practices in the formation of local identities in the southern Italian region of Basilicata. The book uses a combination of text, photography and sound recording to investigate soundful cultural performances such as tree rituals, carnivals, pilgrimages, events promoting cultural heritage and more informal musical performances. Its approach demonstrates how in the acoustic domain tradition is made and disrupted, power struggles take place and acoustic communities are momentarily brought together in shared temporality and space. This book underlines how an attention to sound-making, recording and listening practices can bring innovative contributions to the ethnography of an area that has been studied by Italian and foreign scholars since the 1950s. The approaches of the classic anthropological scholarship on the region have become one of the forces at play in a complex field where discourses on a traditional past, politics of heritage and transnational diasporic communities interact. The book’s argument is carried forward not just by textual means, but also through the inclusion of six ‘sound-chapters’, that is, compositions of sound recordings themed so as to interact with the topic of the corresponding textual chapter, and through a large number of colour photographs. Two methodological chapters, respectively about doing research in sound and on photo-ethnography, explain the authors’ approach to field research and to the making of the book.

Open Access (free)
Mass violence, corpses, and the Nazi imagination of the East
Michael McConnell

This paper uses the treatment of dead bodies in occupied Eastern Europe to argue that the public hangings and mass shootings of civilians committed by German troops reinforced their conceptions of the region as a disordered and barbaric space in need of outside intervention. It also intends to demonstrate how these views on the treatment of the dead later became displaced onto the populations of Western Europe and Germany itself in the last years of World War II. The historiography has overlooked how acts of subjugation, in particular, executions, served to reinforce the German imagination regarding the East and the people who inhabited it. Drawing upon contemporary police and military documents, as well as post-war trial material, this paper contends that the atrocities committed were far from merely arbitrary acts aimed at coercing the civilian population into supporting the goals of the occupation.

in Destruction and human remains
Open Access (free)
Steven Feld

practise a listening through the image or, conversely, imagine an imaging with the sound recorder. In other words, this is not just thinking and working through the multiple media of text, sound and image, but rather working cumulatively at their conjunctions, disjunctions, overlaps and interplays. What is at stake is a larger imagination of collusions and collisions of media narrativity. This strikes me as a particularly rich intervention by the authors, especially given the depth and range of earlier representations of Basilicata in all media, following the legacy of

in Sonic ethnography
Struggles for power over a festival soundscape
Lorenzo Ferrarini

festival. Some of these restrictions took the form of limiting night-time access to the sanctuary, the privileged time when the most unorthodox practices took place. But, as I started to realise during the episode that I narrate at the start of this chapter, a number of interventions were made on the acoustic space of the sanctuary. An important point of rupture was the fencing of the area facing the church, which confined the encampment of the pilgrims to the area behind the church and down the side of the mountain. In front of the sanctuary is a strip of upland that

in Sonic ethnography
Open Access (free)
Music-making as creative intervention
Nicola Scaldaferri

of its results. Cases such as Bartók’s were frequent, though not very often analysed in scholarly discourse, and suggest how in its heyday ethnomusicology was quite ‘fluid’ in methods and practices. Later on, the discipline became more consolidated, thanks to the influence of historic musicology and anthropology, which had more academic seniority and prestige. Simha Arom’s ( 1991 ) study of African polyphonies at the beginning of the 1970s is a good example of research employing active intervention during fieldwork, re-drawing the relationships between researcher

in Sonic ethnography
Challenges and technological solutions to the ­identification of individuals in mass grave scenarios in the modern context
Gillian Fowler and Tim Thompson

attempting to reassociate body parts. Work in the field has shown that increased commingling of remains will cause increased problems with identification.19 Commingling within a grave can be the result of a number of factors, such as natural processes like flooding or animal activity, or due to human intervention as a strategy to prevent identification of the remains in the future. In some contexts, intentional dismemberment was performed on the victims prior to burial20 and this would also increase the degree and complexity of any commingling present.21 In a similar vein

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
The politics of exhumation in post-genocide Rwanda
Rémi Korman

internationale d’enquête sur les violations des droits de l’homme au Rwanda depuis le 1er octobre 1990’, March 1993, p. 123. 3 R. Ibreck, ‘International constructions of national memories: the aims and effects of foreign donors’ support for genocide remembrance in Rwanda’, Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding, 7 (2013), 149–69. 216   Rémi Korman 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 N. Eltringham, ‘Exhibition, dissimulation et “culture”: le traitement des corps dans le génocide rwandais’, in É. Anstett & J.-M. Dreyfus (eds), Cadavres impensables, cadavres

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
Negotiating sovereign claims in Oaxacan post-mortem repatriation
Lars Ove Trans

average of USD1,400 paid by the Mexican consulates per transfer of human remains.3 In the case of the repatriations that do not receive financial assistance from the SRE, the expenses of returning them are typically covered by relatives and the community, but also sometimes by the Church or private insurance companies. One notable effect of the intervention of the SRE in the repatriation of human cadavers to Mexico is that prices have fallen significantly over the last decade. As the director for protection for the United States at the SRE explained to me in an

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
Why exhume? Why identify?
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

legitimacy constructed? The agents present within this domain are often many and varied, including families, non-governmental organizations, civil, religious and judicial institutions, survivors’ associations, judges, and the media themselves. The combined contributions here show that the agents may be local or national, often reinforced by an intervention (technical, legal, political, or financial) emanating from elsewhere and frequently from abroad, by way of criminal courts, governmental or non-governmental organizations, or occupation or peacekeeping forces. With

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
The tales destruction tells
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

the flesh, and then of the bones, as a result of a combination of biological and chemical processes influenced by a wide variety of factors, such as climatic conditions, the nature of the ambient environment, or human intervention.4 Of course, the countless cultures and religions, small or great, have always treated bodies according to special rituals, the product of socio-cultural contexts but also of continual historical developments. One might even say that social anthropology, as a DHR.indb 1 5/15/2014 12:51:03 PM 2  Élisabeth Anstett & Jean-Marc Dreyfus

in Destruction and human remains