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Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

NATO’s employment of military power against the government of Slobodan Milosevic over Kosovo has been among the most controversial aspects of the Alliance’s involvement in South East Europe since the end of the Cold War. The air operations between March and June 1999 have been variously described as war, ‘humanitarian war’, ‘virtual war’, intervention and ‘humanitarian intervention’ by the conflict

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Georg Elwert

12 Intervention in markets of violence Georg Elwert Introduction    backbone of a state, the monopoly of violence. The society loses its cohesion. Behind smokescreens of ethnic, political, religious or other ideological goals appears a new – mainly economic – reference for social action: acquisition based upon violence. Markets of violence are highly profitable social systems, which can remain stable over several decades. The dominant actors in this system, the warlords, combine violent appropriation with peaceful exchange. Markets of violence

in Potentials of disorder
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps, Lasse Heerten, Arua Oko Omaka, Kevin O'Sullivan, and Bertrand Taithe

’Sullivan, 2012 ; Staunton, 1999] . From there I became very interested in the popular response to the crisis in the West and its long-term impact on the humanitarian sector. There are two strands to this story. The first is the enduring image the conflict and the humanitarian response established of what the Third World was and what Western intervention could – and should – look like [ Cronje, 1972 ; de St. Jorre, 1972 ; Gould, 2013 ; Moses and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Learning from the case of Kosovo
Jenny H. Peterson

violence between its two main ethnic groups or the ethics and legality of the NATO intervention there in 1999. Unlike other civil wars, the economic dynamics of this conflict have received much less attention in terms of academic investigations into the political-economy of conflict. However, the same economic processes and relationships which in both academic and policy circles are cited as impacting more ‘infamous’ war economies, such as those in Sierra Leone and Afghanistan, have been well documented by aid practitioners and policy makers as having impacted upon the

in Building a peace economy?
DSI approaches and behaviours
Jenny H. Peterson

, and in ways which negatively impact upon the capacity of actors to positively transform economies, there is also a degree of heterogeneity in the response of operational actors. In other words, some actors have manoeuvred within and around the typical liberal modes of intervention and attempted to integrate more contextspecific, politically aware modes of programming with the aim contributing to the wider aims of positive transformation defined and described in Chapter 1. Whilst imperfect, these examples showed that innovation and attention to social, political and

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
War economies, peace economies and transformation
Jenny H. Peterson

, but rather indicative of a faltering project of global governance which imperils its own success through its reliance of faulty, narrow conceptions and ideological commitments. 2 4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 3 Introduction While examining the failure of one particular policy area, war economy transformation, what emerges are wider conclusions applicable to the practices of development aid and peacebuilding more generally. At issue are the fundamental practices and theories of international intervention, which are exposed as

in Building a peace economy?
The nature of the development-security industry
Jenny H. Peterson

economies and the operational features and trends which result from these ideological and conceptual tendencies. This chapter will explore the nature of the DSI along these three dimensions, assessing the ways in which the dominant features of this industry are known to impact upon peace, security and development interventions more generally. These characteristics of the DSI will in turn be used as a preliminary framework through which policies aimed at transforming war economies, including but not limited to those reviewed in forthcoming chapters, can be assessed in a

in Building a peace economy?
Managing the criminal facets of war economies
Jenny H. Peterson

in the early days of the intervention. Consider the following assessment on the setting of priorities in Kosovo by one police officer: You look at the mission life, and what’s a priority in mission life, and it’s interesting, it all boils down to whoever is the commissioner of police or the SRSG, what their little personal thing in life is. And you can see what’s important in the mission. Every few months, we have the catch phrase of the month . . . Returnees . . . that always comes and goes, that gets to be the big issue. Domestic violence, got to be a big issue

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
Protecting borders, confirming statehood and transforming economies?
Jenny H. Peterson

security threats, customs policies around the world emerge as key sites for the production of new criteria of statehood and new forms of sovereignty. Necessary to the state, these standards are neither developed nor controlled by national governments but involve the interventions of two international institutions: the World Trade Organization and the less well-known World Customs Organization. (2006: 243) Customs reform in Kosovo appears as a prime example of Chaflin’s description. Both the UN and new Kosovo service have been created and managed by representatives of

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
Liberal reform and the creation of new conflict economies
Jenny H. Peterson

locked in negotiations aimed at not only reviving activities across the complex, but also ensuring this is done in a fair and transparent manner (Smith, 2009). The centrality of the market: liberal peacebuilding and the push for privatisation Since the end of the Cold War, developed and developing nations alike have undergone a deepening of privatisation, with this reform also being a central policy prescription in post-communist and post-socialist states. Indeed, privatisation has been a favoured tool of intervention in transitioning states as international

in Building a peace economy?