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Susan M. Johns

offspring . . . [and they were] in great distress’. OV, 6. 538–41. William of Malmesbury, Historia Novella, ed. K. R. Potter (London and New York: Nelson, 1955), pp. 67–8. The Chronicle of John of Worcester, ed. R. R. Darlington and P. McGurk (3 vols, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995– ), 3. 302–5. Charter evidence shows that Mabel was important in the administrative affairs on the honour of Gloucester beyond crisis intervention in 1141 and was, significantly, responsible for the administration of Gloucester lands in Normandy for her son later in the twelfth century: pp. 94

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Open Access (free)
Susan M. Johns

, able to put aside their personal antagonisms in the period 1190–95, when they both wrote to Richard bishop of London, asking him to help the canons of Fougères get possession of land in Cheshunt (Hertfordshire). Ranulf ’s letter was written in support of that of his wife, a rare intervention in the affairs of Brittany.75 The land in question was of the gift of both Earl Conan, Constance’s father, and Constance herself. It was land of her inheritance, which explains both her interest and the fact that she attached her seal to her letter. She was also defined through

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
The Rotuli de Dominabus et Pueris et Puellis de XII Comitatibus of 1185
Susan M. Johns

way the intervention of that government might affect their lives. The surviving records cover twelve counties in England: Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Rutland, Huntingdonshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, Hertfordshire, Essex, Cambridgeshire and Middlesex. Women from all ranks of the landholding classes are represented in the rolls relating to the twelve counties surveyed: from the twice widowed Margaret duchess of Brittany and countess of Richmond and sister of the Scottish king, who is listed as holding land worth £55 2s and eight marks per

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Unreadable things in Beowulf
James Paz

survived across an inhuman stretch of time –​giganta geweorc. A known and named sword like Hrunting does not need divine intervention in order to be seen and used, since it has remained within circulation, exchanged between the warriors of Heorot who have said its name time and again. Yet the giants’ sword defies this mnemonic way of knowing, and its history cannot be measured through the generations of men who have owned it. Therefore, God  –​as a transcendent and extratemporal entity  –​is the only agent with the ability to bring this sword to light. In order to reveal

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
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Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and John Lydgate’s Troy Book
Heather Blatt

significant for the way it shapes the possibilities of participatory reading practices. Corrective reading can be made possible and recommended to readers because the material body of the manuscript is accessible to readers’ interventions. In advocating for its use, medieval writers give careful thought to the different ways material conditions impact and facilitate reading experiences. Finally, the invitational strategies that focus on emendation have not been recognized as contributing to late-medieval constructions of readers, yet manifestly they fashion the reader in

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Daniel C. Remein and Erica Weaver

happiness is what we desire, then happiness involves being intimate with what is not happy, or simply with what is not’. 23 Indeed, intimacy signals a set of questions that organize some of the most compelling recent interventions in critical theory. Delineating her queer medieval historiography, Carolyn Dinshaw cites the influential claims of L. O. Aranye Fradenburg Joy and Carla Freccero that ‘what seems crucial to a queering of historiography is not the rejection of truth for

in Dating Beowulf
The lump-child and its parents in The King of Tars
Jane Gilbert

role in that order as provider of raw human material, waiting on intervention by God and a Christian husband. So much is orthodox. However, she is not wholly absorbed into the cultural model of the Virgin Mary. The lump she produces presents a graphic MUP_McDonald_06_Ch5 111 11/20/03, 14:24 112 Jane Gilbert image of what her maternity would be if it could exist outside the symbolic order; its compelling and repellent qualities are those she would own if not under paternal control. Unacceptable at both the personal and the cultural levels, it is figuratively

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Open Access (free)
Agency in the Finnsburg episode
Mary Kate Hurley

Finnsburg removes Hildeburh from a position of agency much as her relatives remove her from the Frisian stronghold at the end of the digression. Indeed, Hildeburh's return to the Danes after the death of her husband is neither remarkable nor unexpected. Her ties to Frisia are gone, her husband and son dead. An editorial intervention might help us better understand the stakes of her loss; earlier in the digression, the poem notes that: Nalles holinga Hoces dohtor

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media
Heather Blatt

feature to the topos: they invite readers to correct the text as they read. This practice of corrective reading relies on a characteristic shared by medieval manuscripts as well as much digital media: that of accessibility to correction. A reader able to write and in possession of a pen and ink might effect changes with almost as much ease as that of a modern reader who can, with only a few clicks of a mouse, add to, edit, or remove passages in a Wikipedia article. In digital media studies, this accessibility to reader intervention is termed ‘openness’. Medieval writers

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
A queer history
Peter Buchanan

determined’, but also ‘so stubborn’. He is full of ‘resolution’ and is also ‘gallant’. He is a symbol of ‘common sense’. He is courtly, according to Horatio, and definitely not courtly according to Angelina. He is ‘preposterous’ and ‘vulgar’ and yet brings ‘an air of gaiety’. The entire passage is a tussle over the meaning of symbols, and particularly over the intervention of the past in the present. Speakers develop different affective relationships with the bulldog that reveal attitudes towards and various ways of cultivating or resisting intimacy with the past. One of

in Dating Beowulf