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Open Access (free)
The co-operative movement, development and the nation-state, 1889–1939
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Civilising Rural Ireland examines how modern Ireland emerged out of the social and economic transformation prompted by the rural co-operative movement. The movement emerged in response to systemic economic problems that arose throughout the nineteenth century and coincided with a wide-ranging project of cultural nationalism. Within a short space of time the co-operative movement established a swathe of creameries, agricultural societies and credit societies, leading to a radical reorganisation of rural Ireland and helping to create a distinctive Irish political economy. The work of overlooked co-operative experts is critically examined for the first time and reinserted into the process of state development. The interventions of these organisers, intellectuals and farmers built up key institutions that shaped everyday life across rural communities. The movement weathered war and revolution, to become an indispensable part of an Irish state infrastructure after independence in 1922. The strained relationship and economic rivalry that developed between Irish and British co-operators is also explored in order to illuminate the changing relationship between Ireland and the United Kingdom from an economic perspective. Civilising Rural Ireland will appeal to a wide audience interested in modern Irish history and readers are introduced to an eclectic range of personalities who shared an interest in co-operation and whose actions possessed important consequences for the way Ireland developed. The creative use of local and national sources, many of which are examined for the first time, mean the book offers a new perspective on an important period in the making of modern Ireland.

Open Access (free)
Sarah Roddy

oversight is especially puzzling when one considers the central significance of religion within Irish history more generally, and the extent to which historians of the diaspora have examined the religious dimension of migrant life in their various destinations; for instance the churches’ roles in helping immigrants to settle and to prosper, if not always to assimilate, has been a major theme in Irish diaspora studies.25 The relevant literature that does exist tends to be of a limited nature, often following Schrier’s lead in identifying a particular strain of post

in Population, providence and empire
Patrick Doyle

. 22 Alvin Jackson, Home Rule: An Irish History, 1800–2000 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003), 80–85. 23 P.J. Mathews, Revival: the Abbey Theatre, Sinn Féin, the Gaelic League and the Co-operative Movement (Cork: Cork University Press, 2003). 24 Mathews, Revival , p. 30. 25 Augusta Gregory, ‘Ireland, Real and Ideal’, Nineteenth Century , 44.261 (1898), 769–782 (pp. 771–773); Mathews, Revival , p. 5; John Hutchinson, The Dynamics of Cultural Nationalism: The Gaelic Revival and the

in Civilising rural Ireland
Barbra Mann Wall

into Irish history (Galway, Ireland; Arlen House, 2008); A. Dries, The Missionary Movement in American Catholic History (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1998). 15 M.-N. E. Ezeh, Archbishop Charles Heerey and the History of the Church in Nigeria, 1890–1967 (Mumbai, India: St. Paul’s, 2005). 16 Ezeh, Archbishop Charles Heerey; M. O’Hogartaigh, Quiet Revolutionaries: Irish Women in Education, Medicine and Sport, 1861–1964 (Dublin: The History Press Ireland, 2011); L. Kelly, ‘ “Fascinating scalper-wielders and fair dissectors”: women’s experience of Irish medical education

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
The clergy and emigration in practice
Sarah Roddy

have been similar in character. Taggart, Irish in World Methodism, p. 46. 99 See Oliver MacDonagh, ‘Emigration during the famine’ in R. Dudley Edwards and T. Desmond Williams (eds), The Great Famine Studies in Irish History, 1845–52 (Dublin, 1956), p. 384; David Noel Doyle, ‘The Irish in Australia and the United States: some comparisons, 1800–1939’ in 87 Roddy_Population_Printer.indd 87 15/09/2014 11:47 Population, providence and empire I.E.S.H., xvi (1989), 82; David Noel Doyle, ‘The Irish as urban pioneers in the United States, 1850–1870’ in Journal of

in Population, providence and empire
Patrick Doyle

, the legacy of the Easter Rising exerted a radical change in mainstream nationalist opinion. F.S.L. Lyons famously described the Rising's principal political achievement as ‘the point of departure … for all subsequent Irish history’. 8 One IAOS leader was directly affected by the events. Robert Anderson, whose experience of those years mirrored ‘that of many thousands of fathers’, lost his son Alan on the Western Front in 1914. Anderson was wounded in the Rising as he fought as a member in the army's reserve volunteer force known as the ‘Gorgeous Wrecks’ due to

in Civilising rural Ireland
Patrick Doyle

Connolly, Labour in Ireland: Labour in Irish History; The Re-conquest of Ireland (Dublin: Maunsel & Roberts Ltd, 1922), 320–321. 59 Connolly, Labour in Ireland , 327–328. 60 Thomas J Morrissey, Thomas A. Finlay, SJ, 1848–1940: Educationalist, Editor, Social Reformer (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2004), 108–109. 61 ‘Relief of the Starving’, Co-operative News , 4 October 1913, 1302–1304. 62 ‘Close of the Dublin Relief Fund’, Co-operative News , 28 February 1914, 260

in Civilising rural Ireland