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Unearthing the truth in Patrick O’Keeffe’s The Hill Road
Vivian Valvano Lynch

16/2/09 9:29 AM Page 251 Secret gardens 251 it is tempting to read this damaged casualty as emblematic of many generations of the lost and hurt, his presence in O’Keeffe’s fiction is a sign of what has been only a very recent public recognition in Ireland of the contribution Irish soldiers made during World War I.3 Through the attention it pays to Cagney’s fate, O’Keeffe’s novella, like Sebastian Barry’s novel, A Long, Long Way, participates in an important, more inclusive interpretation of Irish history. The veteran’s story is conveyed by O’Keeffe in non

in Irish literature since 1990
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Culture, criticism, theory since 1990
Scott Brewster

– indeed many of the contentious exchanges had taken place before the 1990s – we can survey the battles for the past and the future since 1990 on two fronts: the attitude in cultural texts to the perceived stagnation and repression of the De Valera era, and the attitude to commemoration. In both cases, previous historical moments are read through the prism of competing versions of the ‘new’ Ireland. Revisionist historiography had set itself to demystify the national story, freeing the study of Irish history from partisanship and popular sentiment. The impulse to question

in Irish literature since 1990
Irish fiction and autobiography since 1990
Liam Harte

, sketches his intellectual formation as a liberal revisionist, central to which was his study of Irish history at University College Dublin in the early 1970s. ‘Outside in the world there were car bombs and hunger strikes’, Tóibín recalls, ‘done in the name of our nation, in the name of history. Inside we were cleansing history, concentrating on those aspects of our past which would make us good, worthy citizens who would keep the Irish 26 county state safe from the IRA and IRA fellow-travellers.’55 His reading of an essay by Joseph Lee, which challenged the notion that

in Irish literature since 1990
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Crossing the margins
Glenda Norquay
and
Gerry Smyth

University of Aberdeen and to be known from January 2001 as the AHRB Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies in recognition of an impressive grant from that body) have produced excellent multidisciplinary research, it would appear that scholars are still most confident when working with identifiable cross-border connections – such as neglected political networks in Scottish and Irish history, for example, or in shared cultural frameworks – than tracing intersections in contemporary culture and literature. We hope therefore that this book contributes to critical analysis

in Across the margins
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Location the Irish gothic novel
Christina Morin

upsets our conceptualisations of ‘the Gothic novel’ in its lack of the medieval, Catholic Continental settings associated with eminent gothicists such as Walpole, Radcliffe, and Matthew Lewis (1775–1818). It more easily falls into the category of ‘Irish Gothic’, appearing to adhere to prevailing, psychoanalytic readings of the form in its use of the 1641 Rebellion as its setting. Griffith's depiction of this period in Irish history gestures towards the important role Protestant historiography of 1641 played in creating what Jarlath Killeen identifies as the quasi

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Martine Pelletier

amendments to the Irish Constitution. The play is set in the fictional and emblematic village of Ballybeg in Donegal, the time is 1878, on the eve of the outbreak of the Land War, at a time when the fear of a new Famine caused agrarian violence to resurface on a larger scale; it is also the eve of the formation of a National Land League (August 1879) and its alliance with Parnellism and Fenianism: in short, another of those transitional phases in Irish history that Friel regularly chooses as a backdrop for his plays. The Home Place shows signs of an indebtedness to the

in Irish literature since 1990
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Representations of the house in the poetry of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Vona Groarke
Lucy Collins

aerial photographs were published / Showing the house that backed against ours / . . . / Visited the same’.26 Many of Ní Chuilleanáin’s poems contain strange or inexplicable phenomena and here this involves a re-interpretation of the space of ownership. The security of the house with its ‘tall iron gates’ and ‘fancy grilles’ is threatened in the most unexpected of ways, by a visitation that seems partly natural and partly divine. Indirectly, the questions of land ownership so prominent in Irish history emerge in the present, in the aunt’s story ‘About all the trouble

in Irish literature since 1990
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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

faced with a present that was nearly as nightmarish as the past’. 80 More recently, Emer Nolan has summed up the conventional arguments concerning the Irish historical novel as a powerlessness ‘[to depict] historical change in what Georg Lukács calls a “felt relationship” to the present’ because ‘Irish history did not lend itself very readily to plots about enlightened reconciliation, or gradual but steady progress’. 81 Such assessments are connected, as Nolan points out, to wider arguments about the development of Irish

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829