Search results

James Baldwin’s Radicalism and the Evolution of His Thought on Israel
Nadia Alahmed

This article traces the evolution of James Baldwin’s discourse on the Arab–Israeli conflict as connected to his own evolution as a Black thinker, activist, and author. It creates a nuanced trajectory of the transformation of Baldwin’s thought on the Arab–Israeli conflict and Black and Jewish relations in the U.S. This trajectory is created through the lens of Baldwin’s relationship with some of the major radical Black movements and organizations of the twentieth century: Malcolm X, Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam, and, finally, the Black Power movement, especially the Black Panther Party. Using Baldwin as an example, the article displays the Arab–Israeli conflict as a terrain Black radicals used to articulate their visions of the nature of Black oppression in the U.S., strategies of resistance, the meaning of Black liberation, and articulations of Black identity. It argues that the study of Baldwin’s transformation from a supporter of the Zionist project of nation-building to an advocate of Palestinian rights and national aspirations reveals much about the ideological transformations of the larger Black liberation movement.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Moving beyond boundaries
Author: Dana Mills

Dance has always been a method of self- expression for human beings. This book examines the political power of dance and especially its transgressive potential. Focusing on readings of dance pioneers Isadora Duncan and Martha Graham, Gumboots dancers in the gold mines of South Africa, the One Billion Rising movement using dance to protest against gendered violence, dabkeh in Palestine and dance as protest against human rights abuse in Israel, the Sun Dance within the Native American Crow tribe, the book focuses on the political power of dance and moments in which dance transgresses politics articulated in words. Thus the book seeks ways in which reading political dance as interruption unsettles conceptions of politics and dance.

Open Access (free)
Dana Mills

dance enables the conceptualisation of human rights in movement. The reader–​spectator is summoned to observe two instances of tension between contraction and release:  within the world of dabke dancers in 100 100 Dance and politics Palestine and within the body of Arkadi Zaides, an Israeli choreographer who performs protest against human rights violations in his work Archive. Human rights in a performed sic-​sensuous The theoretical backdrop against which I work in this chapter is the concept of the paradox of human rights. The interpretation of human rights as

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Dana Mills

and ethos of the human rights regime. Using two case studies from Palestine and Israel I argue that dance is a way to affirm belonging to the human rights regime from below through embodied methods of inscription. I investigate the dabke, Palestine’s national dance, which has created a shared space with a unique system of inscription allowing for shared Palestinian identity as well as singular languages to be articulated in motion. I also investigate an Israeli dance work which allows Palestinian subjects to protest human rights abuse without speaking on their

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

Sunday, which premiered in the closing days of 1999, Stone took his first significant break from filmmaking since the production of Salvador in 1986. However, the four-​year gap that separated Any Given Sunday from his next mainstream feature, Alexander in November 2004, proved to be less of a break than a redirection of effort. Stone proceeded to produce three documentaries. Two of these, Comandante (2003) and Looking for Fidel (2004), concerned the Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro, while the third, Persona Non Grata (2003), provided an account of the Arab–​Israeli

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

twentieth century. Other contributions to the debate include the anthologies Cultural Memory and The Construction of Identity and History Wars , including articles that address topics as diverse as discourses of the past in Israeli pioneering settlement museums and the controversy over the Enola Gay exhibit at the Smithsonian. 2 And there are many more. My own contribution to the debate and to this volume

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

is someone without formal political affiliations who is not afraid to offer policy assessments of Afghanistan, Iran, Israel and Latin America, as well as broader assessments of deficiencies in US foreign policy and the fallacies of empire. If there is something of the contrarian in this persona that confounds supporters as much as it riles opponents, then these qualities seem to add to the appeal of his auteur brand, rather than weaken it. The emergence of a filmmaker-​political pundit is part of the story of Stone explored in this book. It is a development that is

in The cinema of Oliver Stone