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Kinneret Lahad

discourse about single women, and not only in Israeli society. It represents a cosmic linear temporal order, upon which social order is established and regulated. In Zerubavel’s (1981) words, this can be seen as our search for the temporal regularity which makes our life understandable. In this instance the train, the train tracks, and stations all symbolize the regularity of the temporal structure of our social life. Moreover, it also provides single women and their surroundings with the means of measuring their movements in time, and the extent to which they adhere

in A table for one
Israeli security experience as an international brand
Erella Grassiani

itself, can become something that is used to sell or buy products and services on the market. In other words, when does a specific experience of an individual come to be regarded as capital in a Bourdieusian sense and beget value? In this case experience in the military and security industry is meaningful within Israeli society, as I explain shortly, and gives someone status. It is then exported

in Security/ Mobility
David Deutsch

bones was a very famous religious metaphor used by Zionist rabbis and appears in Ezekiel 37. 39 For a comprehensive and analytic review, see A. Ravitsky, Messianism, Zionism and Jewish Religious Radicalism (Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 1998), ch. 2. 40 Dobrin illustrates some social outcomes of the religious legislation hybrid. See N. Dobrin, ‘Israelis married abroad with special reference to the immigrants from the former Soviet Union’, Megamot, 44:3 (2006), 477–​506. 41 See B. Cohen, ‘Holocaust heroics: ghetto fighters and partisans in Israeli society

in Human remains in society
Open Access (free)
Kinneret Lahad

enter a committed relationship no matter what, just so that I will not be, God forbid, a single woman … what’s wrong with a little quiet time for myself? (ibid.) Dana Davidovitz, another writer for the Ynet portal, narrates a similar story: At the age of 30-plus, and after a series of disappointing and tedious dates, I have decided to take a break, a sabbatical, a fast from dating, whatever you wish to call it. Nonetheless, in the terms of Israeli society, this is considered a hubristic decision. Who do I think I am, how dare I leave the race to the Hupa [bridal

in A table for one
Sharon Weinblum

seekers onto the territory. The infiltrator as a challenge to social order: blocking and controlling undesirable bodies The second storyline frames asylum seekers as destabilising factors threatening the order of Israeli society. This storyline can be summarised by the following recent declaration of the former Minister of the Interior according to which

in Security/ Mobility
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

already possessed truths, or from a conception of ‘Zionism’ as an evolving essence, or from imposed silences. Our understanding is bound to be distorted if we proceed as if the Holocaust never happened, as if Jews were not forced out of ‘Arab’ lands, as if Israel were never attacked, as if Jewish national movements do not have commonalities with other national movements, as if there is no plurality in Israeli society, and as if violence does not

in Antisemitism and the left
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Keeping up appearances
Kinneret Lahad

8 Time work: keeping up appearances Over the years that I have researched Israeli internet portals, I have detected a repetitive, periodical movement. As holidays like Rosh Hashana ( Jewish New Year’s Eve) and Passover, or widely commemorated romantic celebrations like Valentine’s Day approach, Israeli websites begin to publish a range of columns, written by and about single women, discussing their fears of being—and appearing to be—on their own over the holidays. This phenomenon is not unique to Israeli society, of course. One can easily find any number of

in A table for one
Kinneret Lahad

, marriage requires time and preparation. Thus, the delay of marriage is perceived as appropriate; so much so that marrying too young may now be understood as a hasty and less mature mode of behavior. Early marriage in contemporary secular Israeli society may trigger responses like: “What’s the rush?,” “You still have plenty of time,” or “You still have the rest of your life ahead of you.” The two relationship advisors quoted above express their concerns regarding the manner in which many couples shorten or skip over the “necessary” process of building a good relationship

in A table for one