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Mary Chamberlain

, Aimé Césaire from Martinique, Leopold Senghor from Senegal, Richard Wright, Alioune Diop also from Senegal, and the novelist Jean Alexis from Haiti. 29 Other participants among the 600 crammed into the smoky lecture hall included James Baldwin and Langston Hughes. The majority were acutely aware of being linked through the shared experience of being black in a white, colonial world. This experience

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Bill Schwarz

). 23 C. L. R. James, ‘Is this worth a war?’, New Leader , 4 October 1935. 24 C. L. R. James, ‘Baldwin’s next move’, New Leader , 3 January 1936. 25 George Padmore, ‘Fascism in the colonies’, Controversy , February 1938

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Crossing the seas
Bill Schwarz

Britain in these years could barely be spotted, both in relation to the formal artefacts of high culture (the regard for Herman Melville, for example) or in the more complex arena of commodifed popular cultures. 52 Every aspect of black America was seized upon: the West Indian Gazette ’s enthusiasm for James Baldwin was symptomatic. Through the 1960s, West Indians in Britain were alive to the cultural

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain