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Street and theatre at the end of Fordism
David Calder

Rousseau’s anti-urban sentiment and his anti-theatrical prejudice sustain each other, and both resurface in the discourse surrounding contemporary French street theatre. Wallon writes that Jean le Rond d’Alembert was surely right to encourage the citizens of Geneva to construct theatres, buildings dedicated to representation, machines for effecting the symbolic break between actors and spectators, devices for separating poem from reality, rather than to content themselves, as Jean-Jacques Rousseau implored them to do, with the spectacle of a happy people dancing around a

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
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Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

Revolution. These eighteenth-century philosophical discussions of natural liberty and rights, such as those of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, used notions of contract theory and obligation to the state to argue that women’s duties within the state should be to raise good citizens through their status in the family. 27 Such political and philosophical positioning of women as fundamental participants in the formation of good citizens

in Gothic incest
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Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

works such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s The Social Contract , or Principles of Political Right (1762) and Emile , or On Education (1762)) of women as obliged to perform duties for family (and thus society) without the freedoms or liberty awarded to men as an unfair demand productive of female misery and enslavement. 48

in Gothic incest