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From universalisation to relativism
David Bruce MacDonald

.25 While this was a positive aspect of his early childhood, this heroising of the victim becomes a worrying aspect of Jewish identity. In coming to terms with the rise of ‘negationism’ or Holocaust denial in France, Finkielkraut has severely criticised those who, in seeing Israel as a positive outcome of the Holocaust, ‘mitigate the genocide by looking for meaning to its absurdity and entertaining the notion that such an affront is reparable’.26 He criticises Zionists such as Gothelf, Herzog, and Jung, since for these people, ‘the existence of Israel gives a

in Balkan holocausts?
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Some philosophical obstacles and their resolution
David Heyd

10 11 12 13 10:35 AM Page 206 Education to toleration: some philosophical obstacles resolved lacking a principled value of tolerance – are willing to ‘tolerate’ the secular for their own theological reasons (such as the common ancestry and Jewish identity). This convergence is obviously contingent and hence not very stable, but it may prove to be of much pragmatic social and political value. For a sophisticated justification of toleration in utilitarian terms, see D. Lewis, ‘Mill and Milquetoast’, Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 67 (1989) 152–71. Lewis

in The culture of toleration in diverse societies
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Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

Jewish identity transcended national boundaries, and that Jews were prominent in both communism and capitalism, was another reason to fear and hate them. The leader and the elite All versions of fascism despise democracy and communism for their emphasis on equality. Fascists believe that inequality of individuals, as well as of peoples, is a plain fact of nature. Political systems should take account of

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Open Access (free)
Simon Mabon

differences became embedded within political institutions and society. Along with this, the dominance of Judaism, as both formal and normative structure, plays a prominent role in the regulation of life across the state, politically and culturally. Formal and normative structures have collapsed into one another, changing the characteristics of the Israeli state, where structural violence along Jewish lines becomes a defining part of relations between Jews and non-​Jewish identity groups across both Israel and the Palestinian territories. From the cradle to the grave and

in Houses built on sand
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Towards a teleological model of nationalism
David Bruce MacDonald

teleological model seeking, and then gaining, a homeland, one of the main features of Hebrew nationalism was the covenantal culture it created – a special relationship or series of agreements made between a people and their deity. Much of Zionism, and indeed nationalism in general, revolved around the concept of status reversal, or Covenant, the promise of deliverance in the midst of hardship. The Covenant was absolutely central to Jewish identity, in particular the concept of ‘chosenness’, according to the historian Donald Harman Akenson.6 The Zionist writer Martin Buber

in Balkan holocausts?
Open Access (free)
The ‘defending democracy’ in Israel – a framework of analysis
Ami Pedahzur

Zionist national movement which, like other national movements, worked to instil among its future citizens a (Jewish) national worldview. The values and principles of the Israeli ‘ethnic democracy’ are intended to perpetuate the Jewish community’s uniqueness, its legitimate control over the country and its role as a centralised state in charge of the education system and its various sectors. This approach laid the grounds for reinforcing Jewish identity among most pupils of the State’s schools and creating the affinity between the Jewish and Israeli national identity

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
David Bruce MacDonald

, Serbia’s Secret War: Propaganda and the Deceit of History (College Station, TX: Texas A & M University Press, 1996) p. 117. 52 Ibid. p. 199. 53 Laslo Sekelj, ‘Antisemitism and Jewish Identity in Serbia After the 1991 Collapse of the Yugoslav State’, in Analysis of Current Trends in Antisemitism, 1997 acta no. 12 (Jerusalem: The Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Antisemitism/ Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 1997) p. 1. 54 Florence Hamish Levinsohn, Belgrade: Among the Serbs (Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1994) p. 16. 55 Ibid. p. 251. 56 Quoted in Yelen

in Balkan holocausts?