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Isabel Quigly

continued to send us its daily diet, which, for all the developments in life and film-making, seemed more familiar than any other and still gave the screens a high percentage of their protein. From the rest of the world new arrivals meant new riches: they came in from India and Japan, Scandinavia and Australia, from Czechoslovakia and Poland and the USSR, South America and the Middle East and other places here and there, and

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott
and
Henry Thompson

will in Europe, Asia, much of the Middle East, and still much of Latin America. The recent revelations that the NSA’s and the UK’s surveillance programmes are linked is big news.1 Oliver Stone has been a fixture in the Hollywood landscape since his Oscar-​winning script for Midnight Express (Alan Parker, 1978). That high-​profile foothold gave him the opportunity to build slowly towards his ambition of capturing on film what he had lived through in Vietnam during 1967 and 1968. The young Yale man who had entered the army was a cerebral romantic in search of

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Woman in a Dressing Gown
Melanie Williams

Anglophobia (‘May the English lose the Middle East soon if the loss of their political power could restore their sense of beauty,’ for example) and virulent misogyny. Woman in a Dressing Gown rejects Godard’s suggestion that the basic situation ‘should at least have been handled with humour. Alas! Alas! Alas! Cukor is not English’. Why is the possible abandonment and unhappiness of a

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Fixing the past in English war films
Fred Inglis

(Yale University Press, 2002). My immediate interest in the war films of the 1950s was prompted by my national service as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Parachute Regiment and the Middle East during and after the disgraceful Suez campaign of 1956. Fred Inglis

in British cinema of the 1950s
Queen Victoria, photography and film at the fin de siècle
Ian Christie

given instruction in photography, with all the princes and princesses encouraged to use cameras and learn the still-complex ‘wet’ process. 9 Prince Alfred took his equipment on a tour of South Africa in 1860 and was backed up by a professional photographer, Frederick York. Albert, the Prince of Wales (known as Bertie, and later Edward when he became King), also learned photography, and was accompanied on a tour of the Middle

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott
and
Henry Thompson

towers on 9/​11.15 The film follows their rescue and eventual rehabilitation, casting its gaze across the eyes of heroic first responders battling the fires and destruction of Lower Manhattan on that day. Not for the first time, Stone’s treatment of the subject-​matter wrong-​footed critics and supporters alike. The narrative sub-​text in Alexander anchored the film around a bisexual leader immersed in a Middle East military conquest when the USA was engaged militarily in Iraq. Such analogous conflict certainly suggested to many a polemical intent. By contrast, World

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott
and
Henry Thompson

. Notwithstanding the Reagan era recast as a noble venture, and the Project for the New American Century global mission into the Middle East in particular, Vietnam retains a talismanic power. It continues to embody and disseminate cultural, social and political narratives about the period and the longer ideological and moral superiority prescribed by Henry Luce back in the Second World War. Leading filmmakers such as Michael Cimino (The Deer Hunter, 1978), Norman Jewison (In Country, 1989), Francis Ford Coppola (Apocalypse Now, 1979), John Irvin (Hamburger Hill, 1987), Stanley

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott
and
Henry Thompson

American exceptionalism, Stone conceived of an extension to the Bush Doctrine of endless war, applying it to the containment of China as well as ongoing issues in the Middle East. Thus Stone’s view of himself as someone who should (and must) make a contribution to the information marketplace has been resilient and unwavering. He has highlighted alternative political and historical perspectives in a way that has helped call the establishment and mainstream media to account.79 In a Financial Times article in July 2013, Stone, writing again with Peter Kuznick, made

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott
and
Henry Thompson

decayed and corrupt and immoral, but not in decline. The USA exerts its will in Europe, Asia, much of the Middle East and still much of Latin America. The recent revelations that the NSA’s and the UK’s surveillance programmes are linked is big news.13 Hillary Clinton talked in 2011 about America’s ‘Pacific Century’ and how the USA would be at the centre of things, echoing Henry Luce’s comments in 1941 about the ‘American Century’. All of the countries affected reacted to that news supportively: Philippines, Australia, Taiwan, Vietnam, South Korea and Japan. It elevates

in The cinema of Oliver Stone