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Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Open Access (free)
Pasts and presents
Joe Turner

Muslim women and the order of British society more broadly (through, for example, the reproduction of terrorism). What this tells us is that whilst categories of the modern family have begun to include homonormative couples and rich (whiter) migrants, this produces numerous categories of perverse others who are categorised as not only without value but also not human enough to have a right to family life in the UK. The power of liberal categories of love is to produce racialised perversions but also cover this up. We should remember, for instance, how the work to

in Bordering intimacy
Nazima Kadir

exists between squatters and immigrants, especially Muslim women, who are seen as off-limits and entirely Other. Karima symbolized a world, which the squatters saw daily but could not connect to due to gulfs of culture, race, and class. Karima, then, had a good chance of successfully living in the squatters’ community and benefiting from the available support through its networks. Why then did the squatters in her living group ask her to leave despite her diligent participation and contributions to both the

in The autonomous life?
Anti-Islam and anti-Muslim sentiments
Hilary Pilkington

[Muslim women] have to cover their face. Nowhere. … I asked a Muslim guy who’s a dead religious Muslim like and he said ‘No I don’t make my wife, that’s just men who feel like women shouldn’t be seen.’ (Tim) For other respondents, however, the burqa is seen as inherently Islamic and as containing a more sinister meaning. Andrew notes that ‘the Islamic faith forces women to cover up, and … it allows husbands to beat the wives’ and that this is one of ‘many things that they do which are oppressive to women’. This suspicion that Islamic dress can conceal violence towards

in Loud and proud
Antonia Lucia Dawes

showcase his linguistic aptitude in the languages of the privileged and wealthy female tourists. The South Asians were described as terrorists because of the hijab the women in the group were wearing. This drew on widespread Islamophobic ideas whereby the trope of the oppressed and veiled Muslim women symbolised concerns about the threat of terrorism to western society (Rashid 2016 ). The flirtatious language invoked with regard to the female tourists was of a different register. Being able to speak English or French to the visiting young women connected the young

in Race talk
Reordering privilege and prejudice
Hilary Pilkington

than British Christians by 56 per cent (2010) (Field, 2012: 151). The second element is more specific to those studied here and consists in: the sense of discrimination or persecution of ‘us’ – as EDL supporters – by the justice system and law enforcement agencies; and a wider construction of whiteness as a site of discrimination and victimisation. The rights of ‘others’ A key symbol of the two-tier system for respondents is the ‘right’ afforded to Muslim women to wear the burqa. Nine respondents called directly for the burqa to be banned in public places; some

in Loud and proud
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

the ‘civic nation’ is reimagined alongside an appeal to British values of democracy, equality, tolerance and ‘postracialism’ (Fortier 2008). We see its inflections in the commitment to integrate Muslim women out of their troubled domesticity, or in attempts to work in solidarity with refugees, or in the push to protect the rights of ‘Windrush generation’ citizens who are threatened with deportation. This humanitarian leaning and often multiculturalist nationalism ‘includes’ and even celebrates diverse others, whilst constituting them as ‘welcomed’ guests of the

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

government report which mirrored the concerns of previous immigration policies but focused on settled communities of racialised citizens. In the report the ‘dangers’ of communities living ‘separate’ or ‘ghettoised’ lives was viewed as a failed strategy of a too-generous family migration regime (Casey 2016). What made this problem worse was that ‘minority’ women, it was supposed, were failing to integrate into British society (also see Cantle 2002). Muslim women, the report argued, exemplified this trend. They were presented as lacking opportunities in the job market, bound

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

collective doctrine and controversy. Where in the vestments controversy of the sixteenth century it was the clothing of priests that was the issue, in the twentieth century controversy within and beyond Islam, the clothing of laywomen was the issue, both for Muslim women wishing to wear distinctive clothing and for Christian women wishing to wear distinctive ornaments. The identity of the ordinary faithful in a mobilised and democratising society had achieved an importance which in less mobilised times was most heavily evidenced in concern over the identity of the

in Cultivating political and public identity