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Rhetoric and Identity in James Baldwin’s Revolution from Within
Davis W. Houck

Despite the proliferation of interest in James Baldwin across popular culture and the academy, few, if any, critical studies of his public oratory have been conducted. This is unfortunate and ironic—unfortunate because Baldwin was a marvelous orator, and ironic in that his preferred solution to what ailed whites and blacks as the Civil Rights movement unfolded was thoroughly rhetorical. That is, Baldwin’s racial rhetorical revolution involved a re-valuing of the historical evidence used to keep blacks enslaved both mentally and physically across countless generations. Moreover, for Baldwin the act of naming functions to chain both whites and blacks to a version of American history psychologically damaging to both. Three speeches that Baldwin delivered in 1963 amid the crucible of civil rights protest illustrate these claims.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

the part of news producers, an ear to the street, if you will. Science has, according to media researcher John Hartley, consciously or unconsciously adapted itself to the desire of journalism to come across as a serious activity, which has resulted in less attention being paid to some less than flattering journalism and ditto journalistic methods (Hartley 2008:689). I agree with him about this, as I do when he writes that large parts of journalism, including that produced by the news media, is popular culture (Hartley 2008:689). To view gossip, which takes place

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

hegemonic order. Might these official texts have functioned differently than their popular counterparts? In their fascinating study of the James Bond phenomenon, Tony Bennett and Janet Woollacott theorise that, while official culture/memory may be relatively stable, popular culture texts may act as a barometer of hegemonic reformulation. Periods

in Memory and popular film
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

political journalism on the border of popular culture, a political journalism which moves within the historically persistent and lucrative domain of spectacle, scandals, and celebrities, according to media researcher John Hartley: An endless succession of scandals, from royal mistresses to Monica Lewinsky, continually remind us that sex remains one of the most potent elements of political journalism. The staples of popular culture 106Exposed – scandal, celebrity, bedroom antics – are the very propellant of modern journalism and therefore modern ideas. (Hartley 2008

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Royal weddings and the media promotion of British fashion
Jo Stephenson

‘moments’ throughout history, this chapter asks what these ‘moments’ mean, and why they acquire such force in popular culture and cultural memory. Among these considerations are the issue of national production advertised as quintessentially British in order to be sold abroad and the contradictions between British tradition, the forward-looking drive of the fashion industry and live broadcasting. Also in

in The British monarchy on screen
An allegory of imperial rapport
Deirdre Gilfedder

’, ‘ The King’s Speech ’. 25 Russel Ward, The Australian Legend (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1958 ), p. 2. 26 Graeme Turner, 1994, Making it National: Nationalism and Australian Popular Culture ( Sydney: Allen and

in The British monarchy on screen
From Vietnam to the war in the Persian Gulf
John Storey

, that Hollywood in the 1980s produced compelling materials out of which could be made memories of the Vietnam War. As Marita Sturken observes, survivors of traumatic historical events often relate that as time goes by, they have difficulty distinguishing their personal memories from those of popular culture. For many

in Memory and popular film
Mandy Merck

/05/back-royal-soap-opera . 3 Judith Williamson, ‘Royalty and representation’, in Consuming Passions: The Dynamics of Popular Culture (London and New York: Marion Boyars, 1986 ), p. 80. 4 Thomas Elsaesser, ‘Tales of sound and fury

in The British monarchy on screen
Robert Murphy

-Heckroth have as inspirational trampoline the visual culture of Ye Olde Junke Shoppe. (p. 211) Though he went on to write books on Jean Renoir, Alfred Hitchcock, Georges Franju, Luis Buñuel and King Vidor, who would now be acknowledged as film artists, Durgnat shared the same enthusiasm for popular culture and scepticism about the relevance of high

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory
Paul Grainge

: Eclectic Irony and the New Sincerity’, in Jim Collins, Hilary Radner and Ava Preacher Collins (eds), Film Theory Goes to the Movies (New York: Routledge, 1993), pp. 242–63. An example of the lament for narrative coherence and historicist depth can be found in Jameson, Postmodernism , and Allison Graham, ‘Nostalgia and the Criminality of Popular Culture’, Georgia Review 38: 2

in Memory and popular film