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Catherine Baker

to everyday popular culture as well as highbrow literature and cinema (Imre 2014 ). Indeed, south-east European studies uses the critique of balkanism to discern a common politics of representation and exotification – with many incentives for creators to internalise exoticising Western gazes on their region – affecting music, cinema and literature alike (Iordanova 2001 ; Baker 2008 ; Volčič 2013 ). 1 More than just a parallel to what Stuart Hall termed the ‘spectacle of the “Other” ’ (Hall 1997 ) driving the construction of racial difference since imperial

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Postsocialist, post-conflict, postcolonial?
Author: Catherine Baker

This book explains theoretical work in postcolonial and postsocialist studies to offer a novel and distinctive insight into how Yugoslavia is configured by, and through, race. It presents the history of how ideas of racialised difference have been translated globally in Yugoslavia. The book provides a discussion on the critical race scholarship, global historical sociologies of 'race in translation' and south-east European cultural critique to show that the Yugoslav region is deeply embedded in global formations of race. It considers the geopolitical imagination of popular culture; the history of ethnicity; and transnational formations of race before and during state socialism, including the Non-Aligned Movement. The book also considers the post-Yugoslav discourses of security, migration, terrorism and international intervention, including the War on Terror and the refugee crisis. It elaborates how often-neglected aspects of the history of nationhood and migration reveal connections that tie the region into the global history of race. The book also explains the linkage between ethnic exclusivism and territory in the ethnopolitical logic of the Bosnian conflict and in the internationally mediated peace agreements that enshrined it: 'apartheid cartography'. Race and whiteness remained perceptible in post-war Bosnian identity discourses as new, open-ended forms of post-conflict international intervention developed.

Catherine Baker

's ‘Negrophilia’ exhibition – the basis of Jan Nederveen Pieterse's study of images of Africa and blackness in Western popular culture (Pieterse 1992 : 15) – collected US, British, German, French and Dutch representations, with its transatlantic and transnational scope hailed as innovative (Pieterse 1992 : 15), yet its ‘Europe’ went no further east than Imperial Germany (and no further south than the Pyrenees). Coloniality and race, in this end-of-the-Cold-War exhibition, was not a lens applicable to eastern Europe, conceptually the ‘Second World’ for forty years. Two decades

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Time and space
Saurabh Dube

Dube , “Telling tales and trying truths: transgressions, entitlements and legalities in village disputes, late colonial central India,” Studies in History , 13 ( 1996 ): 171–201 . 6 E. P. Thompson , Customs in Common: Studies in Traditional Popular Culture ( New York

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

was a named political issue (Gilroy 1987 ; Anthias and Yuval-Davis 1993 ; Lentin 2004 ; Fekete 2009 ). While south-east (and eastern) Europe has seen less migration from outside Europe (and that is not the same as no migration), other bonds tie it into the global racial order. These include the fantasies and desires of colonial exoticism, legible in the region's contemporary and historic popular culture, and the transnational imaginative circuits along which globalised popular entertainment travels; histories of people of colour who

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Andrew Bowie

may be a degree of heteronomy even in our apparently most autonomous acts. Clearly the kinds of agreement and what kinds of evidence can be valid differ, depending on the aims of a particular practice, but transitions between the demands of cognitive, ethical and aesthetic judgement can also be a vital source of new insight. I do not mean that other people are free of the mechanism of projection, just that the manipulation of this mechanism is now perhaps the dominant factor in much of Western popular culture. It seems no coincidence that many critics now think the

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Open Access (free)
Entanglements and ambiguities
Saurabh Dube

Fetishism ; David Warren Sabean , Power in the Blood: Popular Culture and Village Discourse in Early Modern Germany ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1984 ); Dirks, The Hollow Crown ; Rosaldo, Ilongot Headhunting . 77 A few indicative examples include Comaroff and Comaroff, Of Revelation and Revolution

in Subjects of modernity
Mads Qvortrup

awareness of the individual’s uniqueness, which had eluded his colleagues. It is still not customary to criticise progress. Conservatism is not a positive adjective in the early stages of the twenty-first century – nor was it in the middle of the eighteenth. Voltaire scornfully rebuked Rousseau’s opposition to science and progress in Discourse sur l’inégalité, branding it Rousseau’s ‘second book against the human race’ (Gray 1998: 38).2 Yet, even in popular culture there have occasionally been criticisms of the unintended consequences of the evolution of technologies that

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau