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Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Open Access (free)
Kinneret Lahad

important role in the secondary wedding market. In the US and many other countries, the bridesmaid’s role has evolved into a flourishing market, producing its own commodities like special bridesmaid’s matching dresses, shoes, flower arrangements, and jewelry. Popular culture worldwide is fascinated by this figure, and the bridesmaid’s role has become especially popular in some of the most recent Hollywood romantic comedies. One example is Anne Fletcher’s box office hit, 27 Dresses (2008), also screened in Israel, which depicts the story of a serial bridesmaid, with twenty

in A table for one
Open Access (free)
Becoming an “old maid”
Kinneret Lahad

4 Facing the horror: becoming an 1 “old maid” The blatant contradiction that exists between the terms “old maid” and “young single woman” is not merely anecdotal data from the flippant lingo of contemporary popular culture, but rather a significant cue for understanding the tenor of our times. Despite dramatic changes in family lifestyles coupled with growing numbers of single women, the well-worn myth of the aging single woman as a miserable yet terrifying old maid appears to have resisted these trends. Rather, the myth persists, as a naturalized, undisputed

in A table for one
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

and third generations, who are referred to by Walcott ( 2001 ) as the authentic arbiters of black popular culture in Canada. Many club members expressed disappointment that their Canadian-born (grand-)sons were not interested in the sport of cricket. As Gilroy ( 2005 ) astutely observes of this generation in Britain, “[tall] children want to play basketball rather than bowl, and the fundamental idea that a wholly satisfying

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Kinneret Lahad

texts under examination are viewed as cultural sites, in which the discursive construction of the socio-temporal aspects of singlehood are reflected and produced. That is, the selection of data for this study stems from the contention that popular culture, everyday talk, and new media technologies affect, sustain, and alter the deeply ingrained understandings through which singlehood is constituted and formed nowadays.8 The methodology and choice of materials is closely linked to these rapidly changing social realities. In other words, this study is attuned both to

in A table for one
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

examination of cricket. At the same time, cricket is an integral part of Canadian history. Canada comprises many diasporas and its history is composed of migrants’ experiences. Cricket in Canada, once the exclusive pastime of dominant English migrants, has been a popular culture of minority ethnic groups since the middle of the twentieth century. As is the case for African-American blues music, which “was once

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Ontologies of connection, reconstruction of memory
Jeremy C.A. Smith

-​colonial domination. In the twenty-​first century, Marshall Islanders live with its radioactive after-​effects. In the years in between, resisting movements for independence, the United States has managed to hold on to all territories in its regional sphere of influence, except for the Philippines and parts of Micronesia. Hawaii warrants separate mention. It is closest to the United States institutionally and in popular culture, though the final say over its laws and administration rests with Washington. Demographically, its population reflects the flows of Oceania, with Hawaiians

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

steel pans,” noted by James Donald and Ali Rattansi ( 1992 , p. 2) in reference to the English education system as cultural elements given the power to represent difference and pluralism, and to stifle conversations about racism and structural inequalities. Caribbean and black popular cultures are produced by people “crucially and simultaneously engaged in a politics of how to belong to the

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

popular culture, where the display of corpses in police dramas, horror films and television series centres –​almost obsessively –​on the figure of the forensic pathologist and the cutting-​up of dead bodies.24 The second set of questions is more strictly ethical in nature. Works of fiction, along with photography and film, engage just as directly as religious or scientific practices with the fundamental questions raised by the bringing to light and public display of corpses and human remains with regard to the respect they are owed. These documentaries and works of

in Human remains in society
Jeremy C.A. Smith

and refinement were expressions of society in a modernising phase, as far as he was concerned. The backdrop to his sociology was a gendered performance of civilisation (Karlin, 2014). Older manners, clothes and customs gave way to new etiquette, fashion and popular cultures.The new civilities were contested but still moved as part of the shift from militarism to commerce that Tokutomi advocated and described. The measures implemented in the early Meiji years had to go further and reach more deeply into society, if democratisation were to be realised. In a more

in Debating civilisations