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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

/the-2004-campaign-same-sex-marriage-urged-by-right-bush-takes-on-gay-marriages.html (accessed 7 December 2015). 48 Daniel Okrent, ‘The Public Editor: Weapons of Mass Destruction? Or Mass Distraction?’, New York Times (30 May 2004). Available at http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/30/weekinreview/the-publiceditor-weapons-of-mass-destruction-or-mass-distraction.html (accessed 7 December 2015). 49 Carl Boggs and Tom Pollard, The Hollywood War Machine: US Militarism and Popular Culture (Boulder, CO and London: Paradigm Press, 2007), p. 2. 50 Lou Lumenick, ‘‘Alexander’ the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

’s phrase.35 Herman’s comment referred back to JFK and the battle that ensued between Stone’s version of events and the ‘official’ account that stuck to long-​established precepts. However, when he also states that Stone ‘succeeded in having his product of popular culture taken seriously as a vehicle of truth,’ he intimates that for which many, if not all, political movies strive.36 Yes, they P o l itics are entertainment, they should have driving and credible narratives, and they should seek to encourage great performances from their players –​but more than any other

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

.pdf (accessed 7 December 2015). 34 Carl Boggs and Tom Pollard, The Hollywood War Machine: US Militarism and Popular Culture (Boulder, CO and London: Paradigm Press, 2007), pp. 144–​68. 35 Paul Cartledge and Fiona Rose-​Greenland, ‘Introduction’ in Paul Cartledge and Fiona Rose-​ Greenland (eds) Responses to Oliver Stone’s Alexander: Film, History and Cultural Studies (Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 2010), pp. 3–​12. 36 Alexander the Great, Letters ATG file, ATG-​Box 24, I-​PF. 37 Manohla Dargis, ‘With No More Parents to Conquer, He Wept’, New York Times (24

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Thomas Dumm

and the informal, not simply as represented on the screen but as people experience it in the constant movement between mini-publics and mini-privates, so to speak, that constitutes so much of the experience of popular culture. The sharp separation of public and private and the accompanying denigration of social life is one of the reasons I have never accepted, in the end, the

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

hegemonic order. Might these official texts have functioned differently than their popular counterparts? In their fascinating study of the James Bond phenomenon, Tony Bennett and Janet Woollacott theorise that, while official culture/memory may be relatively stable, popular culture texts may act as a barometer of hegemonic reformulation. Periods

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Royal weddings and the media promotion of British fashion
Jo Stephenson

‘moments’ throughout history, this chapter asks what these ‘moments’ mean, and why they acquire such force in popular culture and cultural memory. Among these considerations are the issue of national production advertised as quintessentially British in order to be sold abroad and the contradictions between British tradition, the forward-looking drive of the fashion industry and live broadcasting. Also in

in The British monarchy on screen
An allegory of imperial rapport
Deirdre Gilfedder

’, ‘ The King’s Speech ’. 25 Russel Ward, The Australian Legend (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1958 ), p. 2. 26 Graeme Turner, 1994, Making it National: Nationalism and Australian Popular Culture ( Sydney: Allen and

in The British monarchy on screen
From Vietnam to the war in the Persian Gulf
John Storey

, that Hollywood in the 1980s produced compelling materials out of which could be made memories of the Vietnam War. As Marita Sturken observes, survivors of traumatic historical events often relate that as time goes by, they have difficulty distinguishing their personal memories from those of popular culture. For many

in Memory and popular film
Mandy Merck

/05/back-royal-soap-opera . 3 Judith Williamson, ‘Royalty and representation’, in Consuming Passions: The Dynamics of Popular Culture (London and New York: Marion Boyars, 1986 ), p. 80. 4 Thomas Elsaesser, ‘Tales of sound and fury

in The British monarchy on screen
Robert Murphy

-Heckroth have as inspirational trampoline the visual culture of Ye Olde Junke Shoppe. (p. 211) Though he went on to write books on Jean Renoir, Alfred Hitchcock, Georges Franju, Luis Buñuel and King Vidor, who would now be acknowledged as film artists, Durgnat shared the same enthusiasm for popular culture and scepticism about the relevance of high

in British cinema of the 1950s