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Dietary advice and agency in North America and Britain
Nicos Kefalas

to the common cold, according to Pauling, was not a gradual increase in the uptake of vitamin C, but the stabilisation of vitamin C levels through the consumption of megadoses of the vitamin, an approach that echoed Galenic treatment of excess humours with bloodletting, purgatives, emetics and diuretics. 66 Pauling's argument about vitamin C penetrated popular culture via television, radio, magazines and later the internet. Recommendations of vitamin C in other self-help books

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Christine E. Hallett

: The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2011): 537–54. 27 Sarah Macnaughtan, My War Experiences in Two Continents, ed. Mrs Lionel Salmon [Betty Keays-Young] (London: John Murray, 1919): 257. 28 On the creation of heroic myths of warfare, see:  Michael Paris, Warrior Nation: Images of War in British Popular Culture, 1850–2000 (London: Reaktion Books, 2000), passim; Graham Dawson, Soldier Heroes:  British Adventure, Empire and the Imagining of Masculinities (London: Routledge, 1994), passim. 29 Mary Borden, The Forbidden Zone (London

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Christine E. Hallett

War Office file, WO 399/5023. 18 Anon., Diary of a Nursing Sister on the Western Front 1914–1915 (Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1915). 19 Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000 [1975]): 9. 20 Claire Tylee, The Great War and Women’s Consciousness:  Images of Militarism and Womanhood in Women’s Writings, 1914–64 (Houndmills and London: Macmillan, 1990): 19–46. 21 Michael Paris, Warrior Nation:  Images of War in British Popular Culture, 1850–2000 (London: Reaktion Books, 2000), passim. On wartime

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Christine E. Hallett

Zone: 168. 89 On the creation of heroic myths of warfare, see:  Michael Paris, Warrior Nation: Images of War in British Popular Culture, 1850–2000 (London: Reaktion Books, 2000), passim; Graham Dawson, Soldier Heroes:  British Adventure, Empire and the Imagining of Masculinities (London: Routledge, 1994), passim. 90 On Ellen La Motte’s career, see:  Higonnet, Nurses at the Front:  ix–xv; Sugiyama, ‘Ellen La Motte’: 129–41. 96

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Balancing the self in the twentieth century
Mark Jackson and Martin D. Moore

youth and early middle age and look forward to a more serene and comfortable period of their lives. The belief that life after 40 might present opportunities for, rather than obstacles to, health and happiness was given legitimacy by a post-Second World War popular culture that considered increased consumption and economic growth, at least in the West, as the primary route to self-realisation and emotional fulfilment. Made possible partly by increased life expectancy, the crisis of middle age was recast as an epiphany, a moment of temporary imbalance that was

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Perceiving, describing and modelling child development
Bonnie Evans

particular , as opposed to any other descriptive concept in psychology, has grown in such immense proportions and gone on to achieve such a celebrity status within popular culture. Furthermore, no one has explored how changes in the description and understanding of child development have helped to fuel reported increases in prevalence and have influenced the definition of autism now dominant internationally

in The metamorphosis of autism
Open Access (free)
Teaching ‘relaxed living’ in post-war Britain
Ayesha Nathoo

settings in the post-war decades, this section concentrates on the methods by which relaxation instruction circulated in popular culture, including self-help books, radio and television programmes, group classes and teaching aids such as cassette tapes and biofeedback equipment. These various modes of communication were differentially accessed, promoted and evaluated, and reinforced one another as part of a larger communication circuit that co-established a specific health discourse and a growing market for relaxation teachings. ‘Modern man lives at

in Balancing the self
Martin D. Moore

and clinical trials, but even provided the basis for surveys into other conditions. 95 Such findings provoked comment in the medical and lay press, with articles discussing disease prevalence and the possibility of living with a ‘hidden’ disease. 96 Culturally, the idea of a submerged enemy surreptitiously eroding the integrity of the physical and social body resonated with imagery of espionage and subversion slowly pervading British popular culture. 97 Medical journals and doctors discussed the consequences of unaddressed, silent, diseases

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Jane Brooks

sacrifice in the novels of Helen Wells’, The Journal of Popular Culture 43, 6 (2010): 1189–206. 30 Mary Morris, ‘The diary of a wartime nurse’ (28  September 1944), 137, IWM Documents 4850; Mary Morris, A Very Private Diary: A Nurse in Wartime, ed. Carol Acton (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2014), 121. 31 Morris, ‘The diary of a wartime nurse’ (16 October 1944), 157; Morris, A Very Private Diary, 136. 32 Pam Bright, Life in our Hands: Nursing Sister’s War Experiences (London: Pan Books, 1955), 80. 33 Kathleen Canning, ‘The body as method? Reflections on the

in Negotiating nursing