Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

: Routledge ), pp. 192 – 214 . Sabaratnam , M. ( 2017 ), Decolonising Intervention: International Statebuilding in Mozambique ( London : Rowman & Littlefield International ). Wekker , G. ( 2016 ), White Innocence: Paradoxes of Colonialism and Race ( Durham, NC : Duke University Press ).

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

nationality, race, religious beliefs, class or political opinions. It endeavours to relieve the suffering of individuals, being guided solely by their needs, and to give priority to the most urgent cases of distress’ ( ICRC, 2016 ). Other humanitarian codes of conduct contain similar principles. Discrimination in humanitarianism is restricted to triage – where the most effective intervention can be made on the basis solely of need. Humanitarians might, of course, be less than assiduously moral in treating those whose lives they are supposed to be saving

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

and sensor technology, wearables provide measurement, selection, screening, legibility, calculability and visibility. Increasingly, they are also vehicles for the delivery of medicine or reproductive control. Tracking operates through and upon multiple layers: general biodata, such as height, weight, gender, age and race; bodily fluids, including blood, sweat, sperm and tears; and the capture of individual characteristics, including DNA, fingerprints, iris scans and voice

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Privacy, liability and interception
Christopher T. Marsden

typically invest in to protect their subscribers from the worst excesses of IP traffic. Security is a growing problem as dependence on broadband (as a key element of the critical information infrastructure) grows and as the Internet moves towards pervasive computing, and the ‘Internet of Things’. There is an escalating arms race as criminal behaviour becomes more sophisticated. The objectives and

in Network neutrality
Open Access (free)
A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

that ‘groups may be advantaged or disadvantaged by structures of oppression.’50 Intersectionality has not had much attention in legal scholarship, though. Defined as an ‘analytical tool,’51 it has rarely been invoked in court. In these pages, I use the definition of intersectionality proposed by Lorena Sosa, who, in her remarkable book, considers intersectionality ‘a tool for interpreting human rights in general, and for violence against women in particular, consisting of an explicit interdisciplinary approach to the study of race, gender, class and other social

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

is rarely taken into account. Catharine MacKinnon has argued that: [t]he conventional framework fails to recognise the dynamics of status and the power hierarchies that create them, reifying sex and race not only along a single axis but also as compartments that ignore the social forces of power that rank and define them relationally within and without. In this respect, conventional discrimination analysis mirrors the power relations that form hierarchies that define inequalities rather than challenging and equalising them.435 The question is, on one hand, whether

in Violence against women’s health in international law