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The dynamic processes of knowledge production in archaeology and elsewhere in the humanities and social sciences are increasingly viewed within the context of negotiation, cooperation and exchange, as the collaborative effort of groups, clusters and communities of scholars. Shifting focus from the individual scholar to the wider social contexts of her work, this volume investigates the importance of informal networks and conversation in the creation of knowledge about the past, and takes a closer look at the dynamic interaction and exchange that takes place between individuals, groups and clusters of scholars in the wider social settings of scientific work. Various aspects of and mechanisms at work behind the interaction and exchange that takes place between the individual scholar and her community, and the creative processes that such encounters trigger, are critically examined in eleven chapters which draw on a wide spectrum of examples from Europe and North America: from early modern antiquarians to archaeological societies and practitioners at work during the formative years of the modern archaeological disciplines and more recent examples from the twentieth century. The individual chapters engage with theoretical approaches to scientific creativity, knowledge production and interaction such as sociology and geographies of science, and actor-network theory (ANT) in their examination of individual–collective interplay. The book caters to readers both from within and outside the archaeological disciplines; primarily intended for researchers, teachers and students in archaeology, anthropology, classics and the history of science, it will also be of interest to the general reader.

Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

the reader through the archaeological process: the work of making sense of these remains, from discovery through conservation to analysis, interpretation and display. While other studies have touched on these themes, no other volume has adopted this unique stance and structure, which allows us to continually scrutinise how the reception of those remains shape our interpretations. I have taken this approach because bog bodies matter , quite literally, in their stubborn resurfacing into our world, making the past present to us in ways that both touch and appal our

in Bog bodies
Open Access (free)
Creative legacies
Melanie Giles

that became a fecund evocation of damaged matter in ‘The Bog Queen’, ‘Strange Fruit’ and ‘Punishment’ (Finn 2004 ). In ‘The Grauballe Man’ the bog man’s own cut throat is echoed in the ‘hooded victim, slashed and dumped’ of young men taken for extra-judicial execution. The last line of ‘Tollund Man’ troubles the reader with an apparent understanding, if not exact sympathy, for the ‘old man-killing parishes’ where he feels ‘lost, unhappy and at home’. This is prehistoric territory he feels he knows. Heaney’s work would eventually win him a Nobel Prize but critics

in Bog bodies
Open Access (free)
Antonín Salač and the French School at Athens
Thea De Armond

(Hnilica, 2009: 96). It is thus, perhaps, of interest that ROBERTS 9781526134554 PRINT.indd 91 03/12/2019 08:56 92 Communities and knowledge production in archaeology Salač learned French while a gymnasium student;15 he also purports to have been an avid reader of Émile Zola in his youth.16 Perhaps Salač was a true Francophile. Certainly, he was well equipped to take advantage of France’s attentiveness to Czechoslovakia. Antonín Salač and the French School at Athens In February 1920, Antonín Salač, newly habilitated at the Czech university in Prague, set out

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Felix Kanitz and Balkan archaeology
Vladimir V. Mihajlović

vigour… in the development of science, arts, industry, agriculture and mining’ (Babić, 2001: 175) among ‘das Volk blieb im Kern gesund’ (Kanitz, 1904: xii), ‘the people [who] remained sane in their core’ (Babić, 2001: 175). However, from time to time, Kanitz reminds his readers that this is not-quite-Europe. For example, lamenting the destruction of archaeological sites by looting locals, he notes that ‘denn nirgends steht das Schätzesuchten, mit und ohne Zauberformeln, so stark im Schwunge, wie in Serbien’ (Kanitz, 1904: 156) (‘nowhere did the quest for treasure

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

some remains but informs his readers of how these particular corpses seem to have been curated: In Walls, likewise, there were well preserved mummies but they were buried by a superstitious old woman. These were preserved in the same manner as you have no doubt heard of mutton or beef by skewing, that is by placing the body in a situation where the air can get in to absorb the juices, but insects are excluded; so that in time, the body becomes like a dried haddock. (Cited in Anderson 1879 : liii–liv) His knowledge of localised wind-drying techniques is

in Bog bodies
Open Access (free)
Displaying the dead
Melanie Giles

, this chapter has sought to reveal the labour of that work, its ethical dilemmas and some creative solutions. In keeping with the examples of good practice discussed here, the front cover of this book also seeks to bring the reader ‘face to face’ with these dead, inverting the relationship of interrogative power normally bestowed by gazing down upon them in the bog. We may flinch in the face of the violence they have endured – we should do – but they need to prompt us to wonder, to question, to interrogate further and to imagine . This is their ‘riddling power’, as

in Bog bodies
Interactional strategies in late-nineteenth-century Classical archaeology: the case of Adolf Furtwängler
Ulf R. Hansson

’ that their readers love to hear about. This ‘lone genius’ type of scholar that to some extent still prevails in the popular imagination is often perceived as someone who manages to be creative by struggling against or at least rising above the constraining forces of the field’s institutions and its conforming masses. This creates the unfortunate impression that actors identified as ‘instrumental’ are able to produce something new and original not as a result of interaction with the collective, but rather in spite of it. In the case of such creative people, schizoid

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

Glyndwr rebellion (Anon. 1977 ). Its central concern was an understanding of the turbulence through which English Christianity had emerged, providing cautionary context to the later medieval rebellion that was unfolding around the author. But what interests us here is an overlooked passage concerning well-preserved remains. Like the disruptive effect of the body revealed in the poem, its opening lines disorientate the reader in time and disabuse them of any simple, linear history (Schwyzer 2006 : 4). Set in the Anglo-Saxon period, lines 43–158 tell of the destruction

in Bog bodies
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

evident in his subsequent book, The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History (1997), which opens by stating that heritage is everywhere. Now the torrents of invective rain down on the reader. Heritage is not only good, but also “oppressive, defeatist, decadent”. Heritage is “hyped”, “nostalgic”, “its growth [is] also alarming”, it “causes chaos”, and it is “rubbish” and “a sacred cow” (Lowenthal 1997 : ix, 5ff, 10ff). Lowenthal writes that “[w]orship of a bloated heritage invites passive reliance on received authority, imperils rational inquiry, replaces past

in Heritopia