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Design and material culture in Soviet Russia, 1960s–80s
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The major part of this book project was funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 700913.

This book is about two distinct but related professional cultures in late Soviet Russia that were concerned with material objects: industrial design and decorative art. The Russian avant-garde of the 1920s is broadly recognised to have been Russia’s first truly original contribution to world culture. In contrast, Soviet design of the post-war period is often dismissed as hackwork and plagiarism that resulted in a shabby world of commodities. This book identifies the second historical attempt at creating a powerful alternative to capitalist commodities in the Cold War era. It offers a new perspective on the history of Soviet material culture by focusing on the notion of the ‘comradely object’ as an agent of progressive social relations that state-sponsored Soviet design inherited from the avant-garde. It introduces a shared history of domestic objects, handmade as well as machine-made, mass-produced as well as unique, utilitarian as well as challenging the conventional notion of utility. Situated at the intersection of intellectual history, social history and material culture studies, this book elucidates the complexities and contradictions of Soviet design that echoed international tendencies of the late twentieth century. The book is addressed to design historians, art historians, scholars of material culture, historians of Russia and the USSR, as well as museum and gallery curators, artists and designers, and the broader public interested in modern aesthetics, art and design, and/or the legacy of socialist regimes.

Open Access (free)
The power of refugee artists
Saskia Elizabeth Ziolkowski

Italian history, is less frequently covered in migration studies, which tends to emphasize big moves and assume that it entails crossing at least one national boundary. Collections’ paratexts, the words and images around the stories that mediate a readers’ understanding of them – from book covers, to subheadings, to chapter titles – often reveal the different directions that a reader could be pulled in terms of time, space, and genre when approaching anthologies of migration literature. Under each selection in The Penguin Book of Migration

in Migrants shaping Europe, past and present
Anna Tybinko

.) Carbonell i Cortés astutely indicates that the normalization of the Arabic sūq ad-dawāb (cattle market) functions as a sort of reversed exoticism when aimed at Spanish readers (Carbonell i Cortés, 2003 : 148–9), encouraging them to see today's crowded, touristy Zocodover as a bizarre mutation of its former practical self. While the politics of terminology may seem tangential (at best) for understanding the significance of Nini's work in the Spanish context, the technical prowess of the translation of Diario de un ilegal mirrors Nini's own capacity

in Migrants shaping Europe, past and present
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

[RIBA], 1933) In May 1928, The Times published a forty-page supplement entitled, ‘Sunlight and Health’, replete with photographs, illustrations, and advertisements. Readers’ eyes were greeted with smiling faces, bronzed skin, and lithe nude and semi-nude figures in open fields and on busy beaches, or indoors under gleaming lamps and shafts of light ( Figs. 1.1 – 1.4 ). These images

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Ellen Raimond
,
Marianne Wardle
,
Elvira Vilches
,
Alán José
,
Pedro Lasch
,
Raquel Salvatella de Prada
,
Shreya Hurli
, and
Helen Solterer

to the work's musical track. Here, readers can imagine their own voices raised in song, responding to the anthems sung by a single professional soprano and recorded for viewers at the Nasher Museum. Figures 9.27–30 Jacques Callot (French, 1592–1635), Les Bohémiens / The Bohemians , seventeenth

in Migrants shaping Europe, past and present
Open Access (free)
From “mathematical jewel” to cultural connector
Pedro M. P. Raposo

Introduction: a “mathematical jewel” On March 21, 1930 , readers of the Belvidere Daily Republican , a local newspaper from Belvidere, Illinois, were presented with a short note titled “400 Years Old.” Prominently illustrating the note was a photograph of the astronomer Philip Fox (1878–1944) staging an observation with a large antique astronomical instrument ( Figure 1.1 ). The caption read “Professor Fox, chief of the Adler Planetarium at Chicago, using an astrolabe, an instrument to tell latitude, longitude, and time

in Migrants shaping Europe, past and present
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

media. 17 Light therapy for mental health, in the treatment of SAD and depression, and its ongoing use for dermatological conditions indicates it remains within mainstream medicine. In 2016, Prima magazine informed its middle-class, middle-aged female readers that, among its ‘16 Simple Steps to Help You Feel Fitter, Healthier and Happier Every Day’, number 7 was ‘Wear sunscreen every day’ and number 8 was ‘Don’t be D

in Soaking up the rays
Yulia Karpova

1 The aesthetic turn after Stalin In October 1967 readers of the journal Dekorativnoe Iskusstvo SSSR were probably surprised to find that the latest issue lacked its usual table of contents and was mostly devoid of text. Instead, they were confronted with forty-five pages of high-quality colour and black-and-white images of objects produced in the Soviet Union over the past five decades since its founding. This is how the journal’s editors – made up of decorative artists, designers, critics and philosophers – chose to celebrate the jubilee of the October

in Comradely objects
Still more questions than answers
James S. Amelang

provides fascinating accounts of conversations with a wide swath of individuals and groups, most notably a 93-year old illiterate Muslim woman nicknamed the “Mora de Ubeda,” famous for her extraordinary oral knowledge of the Qur’an. It also provides an unusually revealing view of the health of crypto-Islam in different regions of the peninsula in the transition from the first to the second generation following the final conversions. Various anti-Muslim works, that is, polemics aimed at detaching former Muslim readers and even clerics from their

in Migrants shaping Europe, past and present
Yulia Karpova

met the artists’ professional ambitions and personal beliefs. This confluence of interests between the state and applied artists gained momentum by the end of the 1950s. In his address to the readers of Dekorativnoe Iskusstvo SSSR in January 1960, Minister of Culture Nikolai Mikhailov stated that ‘the whole army of Soviet artists’, together with the media, should propagate the best prototypes of commodities and educate mass taste.4 A few pages later, the journal’s editorial board announced a new rubric for the ‘reviews of objects’.5 Just as reviews of theatre

in Comradely objects