Search results

Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

shares with the reader the experience of going through the severe security checks at detention centres, facing apprehensive asylum seekers waiting for their legal status to be resolved and meeting optimistic resettled individuals in Australia. In her interviews, Leung explores the emergent dynamic in the user–technology dyad that takes place in restrictive environments, such as detention centres. Having set the conceptual and methodological foundations of her work in the introductory part

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Phoebe Shambaugh

of international humanitarian expertise. The process of compiling a general issue is an opportunity for reflection among the editors, and we hope the articles will also spark reflection among you as readers. This issue includes papers which touch on key academic debates around authorship, inclusion and locality. It brings together different constellations of authors and demonstrates the possibility of analytical and research partnerships between academics and humanitarian practitioners. We hope the collection of articles will spur your own thinking and generate

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

idea of the capacity of visual media to speak to the children’s senses encouraged by the educational specialists. Among several objects sent by children to the CIDA distribution center, Rockbrune preserved a cross, a letter and stickers, sent by a young reader, who asked his office to forward it to one girl depicted in the magazine: It was a little girl, I think, who had read an article in one of the issues. It was an author who wrote the story … The article was about a girl who was missing a leg … I’m not sure … [The little girl] had sent labels and then a small

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Writing about Personal Experiences of Humanitarianism
Róisín Read
,
Tony Redmond
, and
Gareth Owen

mostly on the authors themselves. I tried to avoid that as much as I could, despite a first-person narrative format. I was very wary of the risk of nostalgia and purged my book of that as best I could. At the same time, I wanted to place in the foreground the respect I had for the Somali people, as well as exposing readers to the pervasive, toxic hypermasculinity that so defined the situation and my own interactions. It was a fine line to tread. I also did not want the extraordinary level of positive human endeavour to be lost from the story. I would hope the book does

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Congolese Experience
Justine Brabant

interdependencies – often invisible to the reader – that influence the accounts of such conflicts. 2 Drawing on my own experience as a journalist and independent researcher who has worked regularly – though not exclusively – in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) since 2012, I considered the work of a journalist reporting on the DRC from four different perspectives based on: my experience as a journalist who wrote articles on armed conflict in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanity and Solidarity
Tanja R. Müller
and
Róisín Read

independent and rigorous, though not exclusively quantitative, analysis. The reader may ponder how realistic such a prescription is, as similar to the term genocide, the term famine comes not only with specific connotations of destitution, but a call for action by the international (humanitarian) community that political leaders may always as much resist as welcome ( Read, 2016 ). Data on food insecurity and famine is always more than technical data, as Maxwell and Hailey’s six cases demonstrate in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

fate of children in countries stricken by war and remind the readers of the existence and the raison d’être of the SCF. ( 1920 : 1014–17) 7 Indeed, Werner’s article featured five reproductions of SCF’s illustrated advertisements, emphasising the collaboration of the press for the circulation of humanitarian appeals in the national arena. 8 Additionally, humanitarian cinema helped increase the visibility of international campaigns. They showed a strong combination of publicity (i.e. ‘the dissemination of light on what remains in the shadow’) with propaganda

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Lewis Hine’s Photographs of Refugees for the American Red Cross, 1918–20
Sonya de Laat

arrangement, the ARC also specified its scope of practice by singling out the refugee as a member of a distinct group within the broader category of non-combatants under their care. Readers leafing through the July 1918 edition of The Red Cross Magazine would encounter an eight-page photo-essay, ‘Fly – the Germans Are Coming!’ In this article, Europe’s refugees were being positioned to stake a claim on American sentiments. The pictures focused on refugees, a category of war-affected people that had swelled to unprecedented numbers. Although not the first time the ARC

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Synchronicity in Historical Research and Archiving Humanitarian Missions
Bertrand Taithe
,
Mickaël le Paih
, and
Fabrice Weissman

offshoots ( Loewenberg, 2017 ). But we wanted to avoid being teleological about it and begin with the end. We hoped to reconstitute all the parameters of the operation. Our inspiration was a little to emulate a flight simulator with all the parameters of a flight, including weather conditions and the peculiarities of a particular plane. We wanted the reader to have the same information as the persons who were in charge at the time so as to assess their decision from their perspective. But, of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
German Responses to the June 2019 Mission of the Sea-Watch 3
Klaus Neumann

south and European responsibilities. The publication of this interview was significant because Bild has often been adept at representing the views of a majority of its readers. The paper had initially hailed the German Willkommenskultur (culture of hospitality) and endorsed Angela Merkel’s asylum seeker policies in 2015, when they still enjoyed the support of most Germans, but had turned against Merkel and begun publishing articles highlighting the difficulties of accommodating refugees in early 2016. German president Frank-Walter Steinmeier and foreign minister

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs