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Towards a digital Complete Works Edition
Dirk Van Hulle

be an opportunity. Instead of producing a print edition, Beckett's bilingual works present an opportunity to conceptualise a digital CWE. Such a reconceptualisation necessitates a shift from a ‘grail’ paradigm (conditioned by the print medium) to a ‘quest’ paradigm (as enabled by the digital medium), which means seeing Beckett's oeuvre not so much as a grail, but a quest, both from the point of view of (a) the writer and from that of (b) the reader. Regarding (a), for Beckett, like for most authors, writing is a constant search for the right words and the right

in Beckett and media
Open Access (free)
Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

office’ 6 due to low staffing levels. Articles comprising memories sent in by readers are ideal in this context for they are less labour-intensive than stories and features requiring active or investigative research. Stacey’s study of female fans in the 1940s and 1950s makes reference to ‘the negotiation of “public” discourses and “private” narratives’. 7 This sense of negotiation between the public

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Serious Charge and film censorship
Tony Aldgate

-honoured fashion, one of the Lord Chamberlain’s readers, Charles Heriot, began his report of 16 March with a synopsis of the play’s essential plot and story line. 2 Howard Phillips is a 30-year-old vicar in a village. He is unmarried, lives with his mother, has a flair for interior decoration and rather too obviously repulses the advances of a spinster, Hester Byfield, who is thereafter

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
The ethics and politics of memory in an age of mass culture
Alison Landsberg

Alison Landsberg, ‘Prosthetic Memory: Blade Runner and Total Recall’, Body and Society 1: 3–4 (November 1995). Also collected in Mike Featherstone and Roger Burrows (eds), Cyberspace/Cyberbodies/Cyberpunk: Cultures of Technological Embodiment (London: Sage Publications, 1995), pp. 175–89, and most recently in David Bell and Barbara M. Kennedy (eds), The Cyber-cultures Reader

in Memory and popular film
A cinematic response to pessimism
Davide Panagia

– and like no other art form – it is in direct competition with God, who is said to have created life and movement. No doubt such a contention is absurd, blasphemous to some. But I hope the reader will accept it as a provocation that Dienstag’s “Letter to M. Cavell” invites; that is, the demonic coupling of film with democracy is the dangerous

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
Open Access (free)
Joshua Foa Dienstag

respondents, who share similar thoughts about what is best for our democracy and our culture. If I have misheard him, I apologize, but that is ultimately something for the reader to judge. And, in judging, I would ask the reader to consider more the substance of the argument between us; that is, the matter of our conversation and not the words or voices we used or intended in

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
Ulrika Maude

may be said to belong to Beckett's equally distinguished line of catatonics. The most famous of these can be found in his 1938 novel, Murphy, which features Mr Endon, a catatonic schizophrenic, who inhabits a padded cell, displays a ‘charming suspension of gesture’ and whose Greek name, endon , meaning ‘within’, reinforces the reader's sense of his detachment (Beckett, 2009b , 116). The novel also features the patient Clarke, who is described as having been ‘for three weeks in a katatonic stupor’ (121), and who has been identified by J. C. C. Mays and C. J

in Beckett and media
Separate Tables, separate entities?
Dominic Shellard

Major’s offence. Now the Major was in court for indecent behaviour in a cinema. He ‘persistently nudged’ one woman in the arm and later ‘attempted to take other liberties. She subsequently vacated her seat, and complained to an usherette.’ The censor had no difficulty with this and the reader’s report for ‘Table Number Seven’ termed it ‘a little masterpiece’. Separate Tables duly opened on 22

in British cinema of the 1950s
Remediating theatre through radio
Pim Verhulst

Beckett to test the boundaries of embodiment in the theatre’ (107). I fully agree with this claim, but whereas McMullan dedicates separate insightful chapters to embodiment in theatre, mime, television, radio and film, the connections between these different genres and media are left for the reader to infer. To fully grasp the intermedial nature of Beckett's work, and understand how his theatre became remediated by radio, a more integrative approach is needed, which this chapter aims to provide. All That Fall

in Beckett and media
Open Access (free)
Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood
Julian Stringer

inform readers of the titles of the ‘two short films from Harold Lloyd’ (102) which accompany their revival of an already more-than-famous main attraction. There is, then, a slight instability in the title of the 1995 restoration and revival season – ‘Saved! Restorations From the Archives’. 11 Sure, by being preserved and screened at the London festival, such movies are being

in Memory and popular film