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An introduction to his life and work
Ralph Keen

. This survey offers the reader of the Commentary an introduction to the main events of Cochlaeus’s career and an assessment of his treatment of Luther. His career falls into three periods: from his youth to the beginning of his work as chaplain to the Duke of Saxony; the years in Meissen, when he was at his 42 Luther’s lives most powerful as an opponent of the Reformation; and his final years in Breslau, during which he completed a program of writing intended to accomplish with books what he was unable to do as an individual. The lasting monument of this period, and

in Luther’s lives
Ami Pedahzur

operations by creating an economic dependency on the State. In terms of values, the State endeavours to shape these organisations in its own image and thus in effect prevent them from presenting pupils with topics and subject matter which do not fully conform to the values that the State itself is built on and those it wishes to promote. These conclusions present the reader with a relatively surprising finding. Contrary to Ben-Eliezer’s assumption that the general population of organisations will fall victim to the State’s ‘bear hug’, and perhaps even

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
From the ‘militant’ to an ‘immunised’ route?
Ami Pedahzur

This chapter is divided into three main sections. The first part presents the reader with the accumulated body of facts with regard to the Israeli response to extremist phenomena and political violence throughout the history of the State of Israel. The second part of the chapter assumes a comparative perspective between the Israeli response and that of other Western democracies, principally, the United States and Germany. The third part of the chapter highlights the theoretical developments accompanying the analysis and submits questions which remain unresolved and worthy of future investigation.

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
Open Access (free)
Elizabeth Vandiver
,
Ralph Keen
, and
Thomas D. Frazel

author, to make him speak rapid, colloquial modern English (and in this case, American English at that, since I am an American translator)? Or is the translator’s job rather to try to preserve for the reader some sense of the distance between the original and this week’s best-seller, in terms of style, tone, and presentation? Cogent arguments can be and have been made for both of these approaches, often called the ‘foreignizing’ and the ‘domesticating’ schools of translation, and this is not the place to rehearse those arguments. In practice, each translator must find

in Luther’s lives
Open Access (free)
Elizabeth Vandiver
,
Ralph Keen
, and
Thomas D. Frazel

attacks on Luther, his ideals, and his fellow reformers – the Commentary has remained untranslated for more than 450 years. In the present volume this colossal work makes its first appearance in print in English – and its debut is timely. At a moment of rapprochement among the divisions of Christianity, Cochlaeus’s first-person account of Luther and the turbulent birth of Protestanism is a tale of profound and enduring interest both to the general reader and to students of the Reformation. Johannes Cochlaeus (1479–1552) was born Johannes Dobeneck (or Dobneck) in

in Luther’s lives
Open Access (free)
Lara Apps
and
Andrew Gow

,and witches in almost every imaginable connection,with the single exception of the one topic that is most foreign and most absurd to modern readers, students and scholars alike: ideas and knowledge about witches. Of the many dozens or hundreds of modern works on witches,scarcely any have addressed the single necessary precondition for the prosecution, torture and execution of witches: the certainty, to those who did the hunting, that witches

in Male witches in early modern Europe
mid-Victorian stories and beliefs
Susan Hoyle

that in an obvious but still important sense I am the only storyteller in this chapter, using what narrative skills I have to keep the reader’s trust and attention; and in the absence of sufficient space to argue my way out of that, I shall merely assert that that trust depends to a substantial degree upon my convincing readers that in extracting these narratives from contemporary newspaper reports, I am

in Witchcraft Continued
Open Access (free)
Demonological descriptions of male witches
Lara Apps
and
Andrew Gow

mortifera.’ 7 Most modern readers will be more familiar with Montague Summers’ translation: ‘You do not know that woman is the Chimaera, but it is good that you should know it; for that monster was of three forms; its face was that of a radiant and noble lion, it had the filthy belly of a goat, and it was armed with the virulent tail of a viper. And he means that a woman is beautiful to look upon, contaminating to the touch, and

in Male witches in early modern Europe
S.J. Barnett

present discussion, past writers rarely inform us of or acknowledge all of the influences acting upon them. After all, why should they have done so, when the demands of their present task – rather than intellectual confessions for the sake of posterity – were of course paramount. In any case, writers often take current common-or-garden attitudes, principles or trends as given, while others are considered as of no importance or deemed irrelevant and thus never appear in their writings. What was obvious to contemporary writers and readers, therefore, may not seem obvious

in The Enlightenment and religion
Hans Peter Broedel

he sends apostate angels as his ministers, but limits their powers, so that they do not do the evil they wish.”9 Similarly, Gregory the Great reminds readers of his Moralia in Job that You see that one and the same spirit is both called the Lord’s spirit and an evil spirit; the Lord’s, that is, by the concession of just power, but evil, by the desire of an unjust will, so that he is not to be dreaded who has no power but by permission; and, therefore, that Power is the only worthy object of fear, which is when It has allowed the enemy to serve the purpose of a just

in The Malleus Maleficarum and the construction of witchcraft