Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 33 items for :

  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
Clear All
Sabine Clarke

-educated English man and would not be intelligible to the average colonial reader; he asked that it might be rewritten in a simpler style.’ 53 One function of the annual report, then, was to promote the value and achievements of scientific research to readers in the colonies themselves. Thaysen and the CPRC worked hard to shape the image of the CMRI through the Trinidadian press. The institute was the subject of numerous articles and reports during the 1940s and 1950s in Trinidad’s daily newspaper, the Trinidad Guardian . In the publicity surrounding the

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Sabine Clarke

Investment , pp. 2–3; Payne and Sutton, Charting Caribbean Development , pp. 2–3; R. Bernal, “The Great Depression, colonial policy and industrialization in Jamaica”, Social and Economic Studies 37(1/2) (1988), 33–64; see also course readers such as D. Pantin (ed.), The Caribbean Economy: A Reader (Kingston: Ian Randle, 2005). 30 Some of the most comprehensive accounts on the 1930s include N. Bolland, On the March: Labour Rebellions in the British Caribbean, 1934–39 (Kingston: Ian Randle, 1995) and N. Bolland, The Politics of Labour in the

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Sabine Clarke

extended to power alcohols. The FRB oversaw a programme of research in the 1920s into two possible routes to alcohol production: chemical transformation and fermentation by microbes. The latter was investigated at a laboratory at the Royal Naval Cordite Factory in Wareham, Dorset, where scientists studied the fermentation of Jerusalem artichokes. 86 A research group had been established at this laboratory during the First World War under Chaim Weizmann, future President of Israel, who was then Reader in Biochemistry at Manchester University. The

in Science at the end of empire
Sabine Clarke

extremely difficult to find new uses for eugonol and its derivatives, and this can only result from fundamental research.’ 73 The generation of large quantities of new compounds through fundamental research and the subsequent screening of these chemicals was a highly speculative approach to the discovery of useful substances. New compounds were tested for their suitability for a considerable range of new uses and this took enormous time and effort. The research sponsored by the CPRC was lengthy, laborious and unpredictable, and the council frequently cautioned readers of

in Science at the end of empire
Sabine Clarke

committee was not immediately asked to refocus its work in a more practical or short-term direction. The annual report for 1947–48 produced by the council began by reiterating the claim that the work sponsored by the council ‘must, of necessity, be of a long-term nature’. Readers were assured that this approach was appropriate because, the report claimed, the CPRC had received plenty of interest by firms in its research and was doing its utmost to ensure that results and patents were well advertised. 18 This did not amount to a significant turn towards ensuring greater

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Looking beyond the state
Anna Greenwood

and Northern and Southern Rhodesia. Of most marked interest for the thematic emphasis of this collection, the story of recruitment to the Colonial Medical Service is revealing of the large gulfs that existed between the face that the British Empire presented to the Western world and the much more diverse reality of the situation in the colonial localities. Readers of some of the first histories of the

in Beyond the state
Sabine Clarke

could be acceptable. The report reminded the reader, however, that the most common form of protection, tariffs, had the effect of raising prices for the colonial consumer. The cost of using tariffs to help new industry ultimately fell upon ‘those least able to bear it and whose standard of living it is the ostensible object of policy to improve’. The report left much to the discretion of colonial governments in determining the exact approach they would follow. 48 In October 1945 Stockdale circulated to the colonies of the British West Indies a short summary of Caine

in Science at the end of empire
The BBC’s Caribbean Voices
Glyne Griffith

Critical in this respect was the question of language. Swanzy’s espousal of regional forms embraced a vernacular manner of writing that transgressed the cultural norms which, in other arenas, were propagated fiercely by the BBC. Figueroa, who as a reader on the programme was caught in the crossfire of these controversies, goes on to say: One is

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Bill Schwarz

the rightful heirs of John Jacob Thomas, James identified the following figures: Garvey, Césaire, Padmore and Fanon. Readers may know of Garvey, Césaire and Fanon. Padmore, on the contrary, barely registers in contemporary historical memory. James’s tributes to those who moved him could be pardonably excessive. But what of Padmore? And what of Padmore’s conception of the civilisation of the British

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

enhancing their coverage of contemporary campaigns and of sustaining their readers’ interest in the fate of soldiers overseas. Their headlines capitalised on the local dimension, with phrases such as ‘A Barnstaple Man at Ulundi’, ‘A Wiganer in South Africa’, ‘Letters from Bury Lads’, ‘A Pitlochry Soldier’s Baptism of Fire’, or ‘Letter from a Leeds Man’ – even in the last instance

in The Victorian soldier in Africa