Search results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • "Rochester" x
  • Manchester Literature Studies x
Clear All
Paul Salzman

: I am a Kentish-man, borne in a Towne called Gillingham, two English miles from Rochester, one mile from Chattam, where the Kings ships lye: and that from the age of twelve yeares, I was brought up in Lime-house neere London, being Prentise twelve yeares to one Master Nicholas Diggines, and have served in the place of Master and Pilot in her majesties ships, and about eleven or twelve yeares served the Worshipfull Company of the Barbarie Marchants, untill the Indian Trafficke from Holland began, in which Indian Trafficke I was desirous to make a little experience

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
Sukanta Chaudhuri

her begot: So sprong the grace Of heauenly race, No mortall blemishe may her blotte. recount by way of praise or celebration limpid, melodious state 21 Southerne] Spenser was born in London, but E.K. reports Colin as having moved from north to south. (‘June’ 18n.) The dialect of the Calender locates its community in northern England or the north Midlands. ‘Southerne shepheard’ has also been taken as John Young, Bishop of Rochester, in Kent, who employed Spenser (hence his ‘boy’) for a time. 24 Forcing] striving (OED force v1 5b, citing this passage). 26 glenne

in Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance
Open Access (free)
Theory and Spenserian practice
Rachel E. Hile

, as, for ilsample, John of Cant., John of London, John Exeter, John Rochester, Thomas of Winchester, the bishops of Lincoln, of Worcester, of Peterborough, and to be brief, all the bishops in England, Wales, and Ireland, are petty popes and petty antichrists. Therefore no lord bishop … is to be tolerated in any Christian commonwealth” (Marprelate, The Epistle, 9). It requires no great critical acumen to recognize why a bishop in the Church of England at the end of the sixteenth century would prefer not to be named as a petty pope and Antichrist. In direct satires

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media
Heather Blatt

). 23 See Brantley, Reading in the wilderness, and Robert L. A. Clark and Pamela Sheingorn, ‘Performative reading: experiencing through the poet’s body in Guillaume de Digulleville’s Pelerinage de Jhesucrist’, in Cultural performances in medieval France: essays in honor of Nancy Freeman Regalado, ed. Eglal Doss-Quinby, Roberta L. Krueger, and E. Jane Burns (Rochester: Brewer, 2007), 135–51; also Robert L. A. Clark and Pamela Sheingorn, ‘Performative reading: The illustrated manuscripts of Arnoul Greban’s Mystere de la Passion’, European medieval drama 6 (2002), 129

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
The wall texts of a Percy family manuscript and the Poulys Daunce of St Paul’s Cathedral
Heather Blatt

, detailed analysis of how the space of a Tudor estate might be explored and analysed, see James M. Sutton, Materializing space at an early modern prodigy house: the Cecils at Theobalds, 1564–1607 (Aldershot, UK and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2004).  8 Bernard Burke, The historic lands of England, vol. 2 (London: E. Churton, 1849), 55.  9 John A. Goodall, ‘The great tower of Rochester Castle’, in Medieval art, architecture, and archaeology at Rochester, ed. Tim Ayers and 160 Participatory reading in late-medieval England Tim Tatton-Brown (Leeds: British Archaeological

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and John Lydgate’s Troy Book
Heather Blatt

Appendix A for quotations from texts providing invitations to emend. 38 Lotte Hellinga, Caxton in focus: the beginning of printing in England (London: British Library, 1982), 101–2, at 102. 39 On the role of the printing press in this period, see Julia Boffey, ‘From manuscript to print: continuity and change’, in A companion to the early printed book in Britain, 1476–1558, ed. Vincent Gillespie and Susan Powell (Woodbridge, UK, and Rochester: Boydell and Brewer, 2014), 13–26. 40 Barry Windeatt, ‘The scribes as Chaucer’s early critics’, Writing after Chaucer: essential

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England