Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for :

  • "Romanticism" x
  • Manchester Political Studies x
Clear All
Perspectives on civilisation in Latin America
Jeremy C.A. Smith

–​86). The American and multi-​civilisational consciousness that Mariátegui promoted furthered a Latin American Romanticism, a passionate ‘reenchantment of the world’ (Lowy and Duggan, 1998: 82). The appeal of Mariátegui’s politics and philosophy to later radicals came from his blend of elements as well as his ability to speak to the problem of re-​enchantment. His thought comprised a heterodox combination of Freud, Nietzsche, Gramsci and Georges Sorel. The result was a far-​reaching critique of Western rationalism. The manner in which he distinguished modernity and

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Uses and critiques of ‘civilisation’
Jeremy C.A. Smith

. Europe’s era of Romanticism was more critical of the idea of civilisation, whereas the progressivist meta-​narrative of the second half of the nineteenth century countered Romanticism’s relativist critiques with the evolutionism of Lewis Morgan, Herbert Spencer, Friedrich Engels and the early Durkheim (Rundell and Mennell, 1998: 20). As the dominant narrative in the second half of the nineteenth century, the progressivist narrative imagined a future of secular dynamics of development based on the impulses of civilisation. The standard of civilisation in international

in Debating civilisations
Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

’. Nineteenth-century Romanticism and a love of wild places as displayed in the poems of William Wordsworth and the Lakeland poets were also part of the reaction to industrialism. The twentieth century saw the growth of the ‘countryside’ as a place of recreation and leisure pursuits, a place for the urbanised to live out Arcadian fantasies (especially if they earned their living in the towns). Perhaps most significant are such

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Open Access (free)
Ontologies of connection, reconstruction of memory
Jeremy C.A. Smith

government was a shared burden in the New Hebrides, heavy French investment ensured that its interests dominated the colonial economy (Scarr, 2001: 201). Metaphors and mirages of Polynesia stoked Gallic Romanticism, even while they condensed the cultural and linguistic diversity of the region. French administration brought regimentation to cultural identity, but also a trans-​territorial economic sphere that fostered a nexus of exchange. Nuclear testing is seen by many in the region as the incarnation of colonial power and a techno-​cultural manifestation of France

in Debating civilisations
Nazima Kadir

mainstream middle-class mores which promote heterosexual normativity and heterosexual marriage and restrict female sexuality. Hence, a mode of anti-romanticism that values sexuality and sexual practices without emotional bonds, with multiple partners, and that celebrates female sexual assertiveness dominates. Furthermore, anti-romanticism is displayed by openly discussing practices that may seem taboo in the Mainstream. In an unexpected twist, this style of sexual gossip then enables a misogynist, homosocial dynamic

in The autonomous life?
Jeremy C.A. Smith

nationalist school of cultural Asianism evolved alongside Okakura’s inter-​cultural articulation of Asian solidarities, but was also a rival vision. The past-​oriented Romanticism of Okakura had no place in toyoshi histories with its positivist mood. Deterred by the cultural and historical specificity of the Western social sciences, toyoshi turned away from universalism. Toyoshi scholars embraced an Asian particularism in its place, which situated Japan at Asia’s head as representative of its treasures. Civilisation was still the premier condition, and Japan represented the

in Debating civilisations
The Marshall Plan films about Greece
Katerina Loukopoulou

heavily implicated with the US-led ‘neo-humanitarian’ discourse of the post-Second World War era. But the director’s agency for a poetic cinematographic discourse lends the film a humanitarian narrative that veers towards romanticism with its focus on children – ‘the living spirit of today’, as the voiceover narration emphatically reminds the viewers. Logan has drawn an interesting parallelism in relation

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
The life and times of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Mads Qvortrup

‘missionaries of atheism’ (I: 1016) have done nothing for mankind.10 This feeling caused a sensation, and created a new trend in literature and politics. The sentiment that science had demystified the world – that the scientists had produced a worldview devoid of meaning by killing the graceful God of the Gospels in blind pursuit of wanton mathematical truths – was a central element in the movement, which bears the name of Romanticism, which Rousseau initiated. Without Rousseau there would have been no Shelley, no Keats, no Goethe and no Byron. Rousseau was not a poet

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Simone de Beauvoir and a Global Theory of Feminist Recognition
Monica Mookherjee

recognition, in contrast to her ‘transformative’ approach grounded on parity of social status, to presuppose an individual who seeks recognition by identifying with ascribed social identifications. However, while the pursuit of authenticity in this sense seems applicable to cultural or national groups, and is keenly reflected in social movements such as German Romanticism (Zurn 2003 : 530), it does not appear to

in Recognition and Global Politics
Open Access (free)
Seas, oceans and civilisations
Jeremy C.A. Smith

architectural and artistic innovation that accentuates portal features and affects (Murphy, 2001: 27–​ 32). In the nineteenth century, British Romanticism discovered Venice for the rest of Europe. The splendour of the city on the lagoon became the subject of art, writing and poetry as well as a haunt of artists, writers and poets. Byron, Turner, Dickens and John Ruskin popularised Venice, but left out the living city of the day. What they did, however, drew people to the living city. When the railway came, the significance of the watery entrance diminished. Its introduction

in Debating civilisations