Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • "Second World War" x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Author: Janet Wolff

This book can be described as an 'oblique memoir'. The central underlying and repeated themes of the book are exile and displacement; lives (and deaths) during the Third Reich; mother-daughter and sibling relationships; the generational transmission of trauma and experience; transatlantic reflections; and the struggle for creative expression. Stories mobilised, and people encountered, in the course of the narrative include: the internment of aliens in Britain during the Second World War; cultural life in Rochester, New York, in the 1920s; the social and personal meanings of colour(s). It also includes the industrialist and philanthropist, Henry Simon of Manchester, including his relationship with the Norwegian explorer, Fridtjof Nansen; the liberal British campaigner and MP of the 1940s, Eleanor Rathbone; reflections on the lives and images of spinsters. The text is supplemented and interrupted throughout by images (photographs, paintings, facsimile documents), some of which serve to illustrate the story, others engaging indirectly with the written word. The book also explains how forced exile persists through generations through a family history. It showcases the differences between English and American cultures. The book focuses on the incidence of cancers caused by exposure to radioactivity in England, and the impact it had on Anglo-American relations.

Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

, scientists. Lafitte, looking back on the internment episode four decades later, starts his ‘afterthoughts’ in this way: The only blessing for which we can thank Britain’s rounding up of its ‘enemy aliens’ in 1940 is that it unintentionally accomplished the genesis of the Amadeus Quartet. After the Second World War this talented and eventually internationally famous group delighted music lovers everywhere for forty years until Peter Schidlof’s death ended the partnership in 1987. For it was in a British internment camp that Schidlof, a youth of eighteen, made friends and

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Design and material culture in Soviet Russia, 1960s–80s
Author: Yulia Karpova

The major part of this book project was funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 700913.

This book is about two distinct but related professional cultures in late Soviet Russia that were concerned with material objects: industrial design and decorative art. The Russian avant-garde of the 1920s is broadly recognised to have been Russia’s first truly original contribution to world culture. In contrast, Soviet design of the post-war period is often dismissed as hackwork and plagiarism that resulted in a shabby world of commodities. This book identifies the second historical attempt at creating a powerful alternative to capitalist commodities in the Cold War era. It offers a new perspective on the history of Soviet material culture by focusing on the notion of the ‘comradely object’ as an agent of progressive social relations that state-sponsored Soviet design inherited from the avant-garde. It introduces a shared history of domestic objects, handmade as well as machine-made, mass-produced as well as unique, utilitarian as well as challenging the conventional notion of utility. Situated at the intersection of intellectual history, social history and material culture studies, this book elucidates the complexities and contradictions of Soviet design that echoed international tendencies of the late twentieth century. The book is addressed to design historians, art historians, scholars of material culture, historians of Russia and the USSR, as well as museum and gallery curators, artists and designers, and the broader public interested in modern aesthetics, art and design, and/or the legacy of socialist regimes.

Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

See also Susan E. Lederer, Subjected to Science: Human Experimentation in America before the Second World War ( Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995), p. xvi. 9 Cited in Hill, ‘ The Physiological Effects of Light ’, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine , 17 (1924), 15–21, at p. 20. See also

in Soaking up the rays
Yulia Karpova

the Second World War. After the war, Soviet factories gradually established the mass production of watches and clocks for ordinary consumers rather than just for high-­ ranking military men. In 1965 the USSR produced 30 million high-quality wristwatches.23 A 1967 textbook for vocational schools claimed that the USSR was second in the world after Switzerland in the production of KARPOVA 9781526139870 PRINT.indd 121 20/01/2020 11:10 122 Comradely objects c­ omplex and high-quality timepieces, ‘leaving West Germany, Japan, the US and England behind’.24 By the

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

history of light therapy in Britain with a particular focus on its visual culture, beginning with its earliest modern developments in the 1890s to its deeply embedded medical and public presence by the Second World War. British bodies were remarkably receptive to light’s therapeutic potential: Britain’s medical body quickly enlisted light’s bactericidal properties to treat skin diseases such as lupus vulgaris (tuberculosis of the skin), and soon

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

epilating rays was pursued seriously and effectively’ in the advertising literature (and likely to the beauticians administering treatment), according to Lavine, First Atomic Age , p. 157. This continued after the Second World War, the language of commercial X-ray epilation machines described as ‘a simple light treatment’ (Lavine, First Atomic Age , p. 195). See also Herzig, ‘Removing Roots

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Soviet things that talk
Yulia Karpova

a number of passenger ferries and a tram car manufactured by the Leningrad car-repair plant.44 Engineering and decorative art had little in common at that time: the former was oriented to solving utilitarian tasks, the latter to creating new socialist ‘beauty’.45 No systematic guidelines for creating different types of material objects existed at that time.46 However, the first steps towards establishing a design profession in the USSR were made in the midst of the Second World War in the besieged city of Leningrad: Vaks, then a camouflage-maker for the air

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

light, just as it did for other forms of modern medicine, and this was surely one of the reasons why light therapy emerged with such force during the 1920s and why it continued to be valued as a treatment during the Second World War. 143 Beaumont reported an enthusiastic new influx of relatively healthy young men at the Institute for Ray Therapy in the summer of 1939, seeking to fix minor pains, acne, and low energy levels so as to avoid any chance

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

statistics for women teachers in the period after the Second World War, and have not read similar studies of the lives of – and Spinster [ 213 ] [ 214 ] attitudes to – single women in that period. But I find myself recognising (and now feeling rather ashamed of) that somewhat disdainful attitude to the spinster teachers. I can’t remember much about primary school, but certainly at my single-sex secondary school, especially during the years, perhaps from the age of fifteen, when I had a pretty active social life outside school, I had the view that these teachers had

in Austerity baby