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Paul Henley

The half-century running from the mid-1890s, when moving image camera technology was first developed, to the period of the Second World War in the 1940s constitutes over a third of the total time-span of ethnographic film-making. This was a period of tentative beginnings, sporadic activity and blurred genres. Though a large number of films made during this period could be said to possess a certain degree of ‘ethnographicness’ – as defined in the General Introduction to this book – many of these were not produced by academic film-makers, but by

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Paul Henley

for film-making within these disciplines, combined with a lack of resources and technical competence, the filmic accounts produced by anthropologists during this period constitute no more than the palest of pale shadows of their textual accounts. This is particularly true of the period before the Second World War, when anthropologists, though often first-hand witnesses to the most momentous processes of cultural change, produced very little film material of any consequence. Anyone who has reviewed, as I have done, the archives of ethnographic

in Beyond observation
Paul Henley

commercial film-making to feature exotic subject matter in the period prior to the Second World War was the genre that came to be known as the ‘travelogue’. Although the distinction may often have been blurred in practice, the travelogue may be differentiated from the expedition films of the interwar period such as those discussed in Chapter 1 , on the grounds that whereas the latter category consisted of films produced as a by-product of journeys that had some other purpose (exploration, the collection of zoological specimens, archaeological research, sometimes merely

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

properly underway. Gripped with the desire to make his mark as a writer, the trip to Asia provided the raw material for Stone’s first writing project: a semi-​autobiographical novel that lay dormant for many years before being published in the 1990s as A Child’s Night Dream. Figure 1  Lou and Oliver Stone, Hong Kong, February 1968 Wa r The themes of suicide and death reverberate through the pages of this early writing, and it is not hard to see how the American post-​Second World War psychoses of power, responsibility, guilt and redemption dictate much of Stone

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
The King’s Speech as melodrama
Nicola Rehling

failure to carry out kingly duties, his profligacy, his socialite lifestyle and his insistence on marrying an unsympathetically painted Wallis Simpson. The film also references, though rather briefly, his support of Hitler, with George VI and Elizabeth’s own initial support of appeasement conveniently side-lined by the way the film skips almost directly from the abdication to the outbreak of the Second World War. 48

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

post-​Second World War era. In the light of this career trajectory, this chapter traces two key threads in Stone’s exploration of corporations through the films above, and their impact on wider society: one to do with the media, and the other concerning government. In Any Given Sunday, Stone returned to some of the themes of media manipulation that he had tackled in Talk Radio. The first part of this chapter revisits these two films, exploring how and why the critique of corporations manifested itself in a particular way during this era. Despite less politically

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
The cinematic afterlife of an early modern political diva
Elisabeth Bronfen and Barbara Straumann

heroine’, Dobson and Watson trace how, for example, the early modern queen was turned into the plain-speaking and beef-eating figure of Queen Bess, who came to stand for a nostalgic recollection of an idyllic ‘Merry Old England’, how the first Elizabeth was invoked to celebrate the coronation of the second Elizabeth as the hopeful beginning of a new Elizabethan age in the aftermath of the Second World War, or how the

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
The early films of John Marshall and Timothy Asch
Paul Henley

. The Hunters and the Great Kalahari Debate Of all the English-language ethnographic film documentation projects initiated in the period after the Second World War, by far the most prolonged was the one developed by John Marshall, which he began when he was barely 18 years old. Marshall would later become one of the most acclaimed ethnographic film-makers of the latter part of the twentieth century, but at the beginning, he appears to have taken up the moving image camera more on account of the influence of his father

in Beyond observation
Robert Murphy

the Flashbacks shop in Soho – who agreed to teach it with me; and to Raymond Durgnat’s A Mirror for England which proved to be a mine of useful and inspiring information about a period of British cinema no one else seemed to take seriously. My most recent book is British Cinema and the Second World War (Continuum, 2000). Robert Murphy.

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Serious Charge and film censorship
Tony Aldgate

Press, 1995). I have also written, with Jeffrey Richards, Best of British: Cinema and Society from 1930 to the Present (I.B. Tauris, 2nd edn, 1999) and Britain Can Take It: The British Cinema in the Second World War (Edinburgh University Press, 2nd edn, 1995). Tony Aldgate

in British cinema of the 1950s