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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

properly underway. Gripped with the desire to make his mark as a writer, the trip to Asia provided the raw material for Stone’s first writing project: a semi-​autobiographical novel that lay dormant for many years before being published in the 1990s as A Child’s Night Dream. Figure 1  Lou and Oliver Stone, Hong Kong, February 1968 Wa r The themes of suicide and death reverberate through the pages of this early writing, and it is not hard to see how the American post-​Second World War psychoses of power, responsibility, guilt and redemption dictate much of Stone

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

post-​Second World War era. In the light of this career trajectory, this chapter traces two key threads in Stone’s exploration of corporations through the films above, and their impact on wider society: one to do with the media, and the other concerning government. In Any Given Sunday, Stone returned to some of the themes of media manipulation that he had tackled in Talk Radio. The first part of this chapter revisits these two films, exploring how and why the critique of corporations manifested itself in a particular way during this era. Despite less politically

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

the Second World War. Themes aired by the Founding Fathers, including Alexander Hamilton’s defence of commerce as an aid to government vitality, and James Madison’s call for justice and the public good, had been given a new relevance during the Great Depression.37 In his inaugural address in 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt had castigated the money changers and their failings, adding that happiness lay ‘not in the mere possession of money’ but ‘in the joy of achievement and the thrill of creative effort’.38 That sense of wider purpose and responsibility is

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

the Capraesque theme of heroes fighting the system with a little help from the ‘people’, post-​Second World War depictions acknowledged ever-​growing limitations on successful individual action: a binary separation that Capra’s Mr. Smith and State of the Union represent very nicely. The power of the system to corrupt individuals evoked in All the King’s Men (Robert Rossen, 1949) and Advise and Consent (Otto Preminger, 1962) then took a much darker turn in several New Hollywood-​ era productions, including The Candidate (Michael Ritchie, 1972), Executive Action

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

studied some history, and who would be open to an alternative view. The only talking head I did for the series was an interview with Tariq Ali for a thirteenth hour to be included in the October DVD release: we used new archive footage for this. Otherwise, no talking heads were used: it would never have worked; we would never have made the 58:30, it would have slowed the pace down totally. With a talking head you are affirming points more slowly than can be made in a narrative flow. Overall, we were trying to make the case that after the Second World War, the United

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
The King’s Speech as melodrama
Nicola Rehling

failure to carry out kingly duties, his profligacy, his socialite lifestyle and his insistence on marrying an unsympathetically painted Wallis Simpson. The film also references, though rather briefly, his support of Hitler, with George VI and Elizabeth’s own initial support of appeasement conveniently side-lined by the way the film skips almost directly from the abdication to the outbreak of the Second World War. 48

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
The cinematic afterlife of an early modern political diva
Elisabeth Bronfen and Barbara Straumann

heroine’, Dobson and Watson trace how, for example, the early modern queen was turned into the plain-speaking and beef-eating figure of Queen Bess, who came to stand for a nostalgic recollection of an idyllic ‘Merry Old England’, how the first Elizabeth was invoked to celebrate the coronation of the second Elizabeth as the hopeful beginning of a new Elizabethan age in the aftermath of the Second World War, or how the

in The British monarchy on screen
Robert Murphy

the Flashbacks shop in Soho – who agreed to teach it with me; and to Raymond Durgnat’s A Mirror for England which proved to be a mine of useful and inspiring information about a period of British cinema no one else seemed to take seriously. My most recent book is British Cinema and the Second World War (Continuum, 2000). Robert Murphy.

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Serious Charge and film censorship
Tony Aldgate

Press, 1995). I have also written, with Jeffrey Richards, Best of British: Cinema and Society from 1930 to the Present (I.B. Tauris, 2nd edn, 1999) and Britain Can Take It: The British Cinema in the Second World War (Edinburgh University Press, 2nd edn, 1995). Tony Aldgate

in British cinema of the 1950s
Screening Victoria
Steven Fielding

Victoria with policies which audiences were presumed to support, having her embody the imperial consensus of the time. In contrast, films made after the outbreak of the Second World War – The Prime Minister (1941) and The Mudlark (1950) – presented the widowed Victoria as more concerned with her people’s domestic welfare, an interest appropriate to the People’s War and the postwar social democratic

in The British monarchy on screen