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Open Access (free)
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

is one of the vaguest branches of international law. We are told that intervention is a right; that it is a crime; that it is the rule; that it is the exception; that it is never permissible at all’. 3 Following the Second World War the problem with intervention continued to be discussed in the international law and international relations literature. 4 In the post-Cold War era, with increasing interventionism, interest hardly diminished, the main

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Civilisation, civil society and the Kosovo war
Mikkel Vedby Rasmussen

the system of cosmopolitan security which Kant had argued would be the culmination of human history. Therefore, the alliance of democracies that came into being after the Second World War was regarded not only as an alliance of states but as the culmination of Western civilisation. 45 History, Gress ironically points out, was constructed as a progression ‘from Plato to NATO’. 46 Therefore, when

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Open Access (free)
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

is suggested here, lies in considering the enduring importance of the post-Second World War ‘Atlantic Community’ that has developed amongst the NATO members, and the de facto extension of its boundaries since the end of the Cold War. Serb activities in Kosovo, it is argued, represented not a territorial threat to NATO but rather a challenge to the core values for which it claimed to stand. A response was thus deemed

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Democratisation, nationalism and security in former Yugoslavia
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

Dayton agreement as it has since been known, provided for a comprehensive political settlement to the bloodiest European conflict since the end of the Second World War. The conflict had resulted in thousands of deaths, hundreds of thousands displaced from their homes by ethnic cleansing and physical destruction of property and infrastructure on a scale not seen in Europe for forty years. In addition to ending the violence, the Dayton agreement sought

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

Transatlantic relations have been a core issue in European – especially West European – security since the end of the Second World War. The first section of this chapter examines the nature of the transatlantic relationship and its Cold War evolution. Attention then moves, in the second section, to considering its development during the years since 1989. It will then be argued, in the third and final

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Iver B. Neumann

. In this context it is not a coincidence that the Balkan wars of the 1990s in the former Yugoslavia were fought out directly between ethnic groups, whereas the previous civil conflict, in the wake of the Second World War, had been fought out between proletarian and middle-class partisans. It follows that, in order to mediate between these ethnic tensions, one needs a multi-ethnic rhetoric, and no

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Heikki Patomäki

because it is so strong and simple that it tends to eradicate nuances and complications. Normatively, it is problematical because it lapses so easily itself into a form of Manicheanism. So let me explicate this claim. 20 The claim is that there has been a tendency in post-Second World War US foreign policy discourse, first of all, to imagine a morally pure ideal: ‘free market

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Maja Zehfuss

for the first time since the end of the Second World War’, 60 those in charge in the FRG were not exactly the usual suspects. They had grown up as participants in sit-ins at NATO’s missile bases, in human chains and at ‘peace workshops’, 61 and looked distinctly uncomfortable in their current role of commanding the military in a real war. The irony of their position was not lost on

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Open Access (free)
A European fin de siècle
Sergei Medvedev

into the fresh snow. However, the long-awaited liberation does not bring freedom. Days go by, and as people are still kept inside the camp, the occupation authorities install a new repressive order, using the prisoners as bargaining chips in the geopolitical game of late Second World War. This is a film about the absurdity of heroic myths, a story of both hope and disillusionment, and of the anguish and torment that

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

University of Paris and later Greek Foreign Minister, made the following important point in his book on international morality, written just before the Second World War and published posthumously: 132 Every people has the right to organise itself as it wants … without other countries being in the position to oppose or to intervene in what are internal affairs.… But … such a right will merit due respect on the

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century