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Open Access (free)
Christine E. Hallett

end of the 1920s, very few were widely available.2 The publication of soldiers’ memoirs followed a very different pattern. Very few had been produced during the war itself,3 but the late 1920s and early 1930s saw an outpouring of powerful and moving memoirs, which were produced in large numbers and were widely read. Among them were Edmund Blunden’s Undertones of War, Siegfried Sassoon’s Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man, Erich Maria Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front, and Robert Graves’s Goodbye to All That.4 Soon after the publication of the earliest soldier

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Christine E. Hallett

’s Progress.1 The romantic, narrative trope involved the testing of a (male) hero, through the ‘ordeal’ of his experience. If he could withstand this test, he would be transformed through ‘apotheosis’ – a process that mirrored religious ideas of transcendence. The hero was, therefore, not just courageous, but also saintly: morally and spiritually pure. For the young men of the war generation, combat was their ordeal; surviving it with ‘honour’ would result in self-transformation. 211 Volunteer girls Such ‘myths’ were exploded, after the war, by writers such as Siegfried

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Balance, malleability and anthropology: historical contexts
Chris Millard

Expedition to the Torres Strait; he later did ethnographic work in India and the Solomon Islands. 13 It is as psychiatrist to First World War poet Siegfried Sassoon that Rivers is best known, and Rivers's evidence to the War Office Committee of Enquiry into ‘Shell-Shock’ shows how his work is explicitly concerned with adaptation, specifically with the effects of being unable to adapt to circumstances. He argues that ‘Every animal has a natural reaction to danger … and man's is manipulation of such a kind as to get him out

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Christine E. Hallett

war generation to destruction. It was also an act of feminism. In her later memoir, Testament of Experience, Brittain described how she had read the war memoirs of Robert Graves, Richard Aldington, Erich Maria Remarque, Ernest Hemingway, Edmund Blunden, and Siegfried Sassoon, and wondered: ‘Why should these young men have the war to themselves?’.41 Women, too, had entered war with high ideals, suffered disillusionment, and then somehow found the courage to go on. Although Testament of Youth was written primarily in memory of the men Brittain had lost – her fiancé

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain
Winston James

’s Magazine and a staunch supporter of McKay’s, wrote letters to George Bernard Shaw (whom McKay was to meet shortly after his arrival) and the publisher Grant Richards. Harris asked Richards to introduce McKay to Siegfried Sassoon. ‘See that he gets a good welcome[,] will you’, Harris wrote, in a tone at once beseeching and commanding. 15 Max Eastman and his sister Crystal Eastman, editors of the

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Robert Mackay

’s End (1929), Siegfried Sassoon, The Complete Memoirs of George Sherston (1937), Robert Graves, Goodbye to All That (1929), Philip Noel-Baker, Hawkers of Death (1934), C. S. Forester, The General (1936). 14 Harold Nicolson, Diaries and Letters 1939–45 (Collins,1967), p. 52. 15 Hugh Dalton, The Fateful Years (Frederick Muller, 1957), p. 200. 16 See J. Bardon, A History of Ulster (The Blackstaff Press, 1992), pp. 552–5. 17 O’Brien, Civil Defence, pp. 95–6. 18 Hansard, 15 November 1937, vol. 329, col. 42. 19 Report of the Committee on Evacuation, Cmd. 5837, p. 3. 20

in Half the battle