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Affiliation, allusion, allegory
Rachel E. Hile

2 Spenser’s satire of indirection: affiliation, allusion, allegory The previous chapter provided a preliminary analysis of how indirect satire works to create a sense of an allegorical connection to the real world and real situations and discussed how allusions, symbolism, and analogy prompted allegorical projections that inflected contemporaries’ understanding of the message of Mother Hubberds Tale, Spenser’s best-known satirical work. In this chapter, I will continue analyzing Spenserian indirection in satire, but with an additional concept in play by

in Spenserian satire
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A tradition of indirection
Author: Rachel E. Hile

This book examines the satirical poetry of Edmund Spenser and argues for his importance as a model and influence for younger poets writing satires in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The book focuses on reading satirical texts of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in relation to one another, with specific attention to the role that Edmund Spenser plays in that literary subsystem. The book connects key Spenserian texts in The Shepheardes Calender and the Complaints volume with poems by a range of authors in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, including Joseph Hall, Thomas Nashe, Tailboys Dymoke, Thomas Middleton, and George Wither to advance the thesis that Spenser was seen by his contemporaries as highly relevant to satire in Elizabethan England. For scholars of satire, the book offers a fuller discussion and theorization of the type of satire that Spenser wrote, “indirect satire,” than has been provided elsewhere. A theory of indirect satire benefits not just Spenser studies, but satire studies as well. For scholars of English Renaissance satire in particular, who have tended to focus on the formal verse satires of the 1590s to the exclusion of attention to more indirect forms such as Spenser’s, this book is a corrective, an invitation to recognize the importance of a style of satire that has received little attention.

Rachel E. Hile

3 Spenser and the English literary system in the 1590s The previous two chapters have analyzed Spenser’s methods of creating satirical meaning in his early poetry. It would now be sensible, and might even be expected, to devote a chapter to the satirical episodes in The Faerie Queene, especially the second installation of 1596, which includes a great deal more allegorical commentary on contemporary historical events than the first three books do. Instead, I veer in another direction entirely and in the remainder of the book will consider how other poets used

in Spenserian satire
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Theory and Spenserian practice
Rachel E. Hile

1 Indirect satire: theory and Spenserian practice In Edmund Spenser’s Prosopopoia; or, Mother Hubberds Tale, a tonal shift characterizes the final episode, in which the villainous Fox and Ape, having wreaked havoc in the three estates as husbandmen, clerics, and courtiers, go even farther by usurping royal power. The self-conscious Chaucerianism of the first episodes—summarized by Kent van den Berg as “the recreative fiction that animals are like men”—gives way to a more fully developed, and more clearly satirical, fictional world in which “men are like animals

in Spenserian satire
Rachel E. Hile

4 Spenserian “entry codes” to  ­indirect  satire In his own satirical poetry, Edmund Spenser criticized indirectly, requiring readers to interpret clues carefully to access satirical meanings. For some readers, such as Joseph Hall and William Bedell, Spenser’s reputation as a decorous, conservative poet seemed to obscure awareness of him as also demonstrating an interest in or affinity for satirical writing, as discussed in Chapter 3. This chapter offers a corrective in the form of “case studies” of three poets who were quite sensitively attuned to the potential

in Spenserian satire
Rachel E. Hile

) repay scrutiny, not only for what they can tell us about Middleton’s youthful political views but also for what we can learn about the understanding of Spenser’s importance as a satirist during this time period. In these two works, we see a young writer trying to demonstrate his political and religious allegiance to the ideas and positions associated with Spenser without getting into trouble.1 This goal—to be critical but not too critical, to be understood by some while not incurring censorship from others—says much about the connections between politics, religion

in Spenserian satire
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Imitation of Spenserian satire
Rachel E. Hile

6 After the Bishops’ Ban: imitation of Spenserian satire Spenser’s death in 1599, the promulgation of the Bishops’ Ban in 1599, and the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603—each of these could be expected to affect the writing of poetry in England, with Spenser’s influence becoming modified by nostalgia, authors trying to interpret the text of the Bishops’ Ban to determine how to respond to its directive “That noe Satyres or Epigramms be printed hereafter” (qtd. in McCabe, “Elizabethan satire,” 188), and everyone watching to see what degree of oversight of the

in Spenserian satire
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Rachel E. Hile

densely allusive literary culture of the early modern period, intertextual transfer suffices to “get” the joke, and much of this book will focus on indirect satirical writing that uses intertextuality, especially with Spenser’s works, to create its satirical meanings. However, intersemiosis is a broader term than intertextuality, and another project of this book is to explore literary fame and ideas of “the Author” as a semiotic system used by the satirical poets discussed in this book in order to position themselves within the literary field and to clue the reader to

in Spenserian satire
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Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

In James Shirley’s St Patrick for Ireland , first performed in the Werburgh St Theatre in Dublin in 1639, the Irish prince Corybreus becomes invisible by means of a magical bracelet provided by the pagan priest Archimagus, an explicit reference to the deceitful, Catholic Archimago of Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene. 10 Corybreus uses the bracelet in a plot to rape a noblewoman named Emeria, and

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Steve Sohmer

The Carey family had close ties to other members of Shakespeare’s circle. George Carey’s wife and daughter, both named Elizabeth, were patrons of writers including Edmund Spenser and Nashe. George’s daughter and heiress, Elizabeth, married Sir Thomas Berkeley, son and heir of Henry, Lord Berkeley

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind