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Mia-Marie Hammarlin

chairman for the Social Democrats, formed a recurrent component in my conversations with journalists. These events had taken place around a year and a half prior to my interviews. It was seldom I who raised this particular topic. Instead, the reporters were encouraged to let their thoughts range freely around a variety of political scandals. 132Exposed The answer to the question of why this story kept recurring probably has to do with its exceptional character. Never before has a Swedish party leader – and, in addition to that, the leader of such a large party as the

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Living with scandal, rumour, and gossip

This book illuminates the personal experience of being at the centre of a media scandal. The existential level of that experience is highlighted by means of the application of ethnological and phenomenological perspectives to extensive empirical material drawn from a Swedish context. The questions raised and answered in this book include the following: How does the experience of being the protagonist in a media scandal affect a person’s everyday life? What happens to routines, trust, and self-confidence? How does it change the basic settings of his or her lifeworld?

The analysis also contributes new perspectives on the fusion between interpersonal communication that takes place face to face, such as gossip and rumours, and traditional news media in the course of a scandal. A scandal derives its momentum from the audiences, whose engagement in the moral story determines its dissemination and duration. The nature of that engagement also affects the protagonist in specific ways. Members of the public participate through traditional oral communication, one vital aspect of which is activity in digital, social forums.

The author argues that gossip and rumour must be included in the idea of the media system if we are to be able to understand the formation and power of a media scandal, a contention which entails critiques of earlier research. Oral interpersonal communication does not disappear when new communication possibilities arise. Indeed, it may be invigorated by them. The term news legend is introduced, to capture the entanglement between traditional news-media storytelling and oral narrative.

Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

. And very entertaining. It should, by way of introduction, be said that media landscapes differ a great deal from one country to another. Scandals in Sweden cannot be directly compared to scandals in the United States, or to scandals in other parts of the world for that matter. At the same time, scandals are connected across the borders of countries and across continents, not only through the universal, emotional experiences undergone by the main figures of these scandals and their families, but also through a kind of resilience over time that characterises the

in Exposed
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

doubtful whether distinguishing among closely related words and phenomena in the way Thompson does enriches the analysis. In fact, I believe it becomes limiting. I would venture to claim that it is a mistake to see the processes of media scandals as separate from the everyday talk that is produced in face-to-face meetings, an idea that Lars Nord, a Swedish professor of political communication who has studied Swedish political scandals, seems to take as his point of departure: ‘What differentiates the modern political scandal from the classic one is that the scandal no

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

Book about Love” Is Another Unoriginal Sin’, New York Times, 6 July 2016). Floorball Dad 109 the crime was publicly admitted, were milder versions. In Swedish agricultural society there was a variant intended for so-called whores, that is to say women who had given birth to children out of wedlock and who were for that reason forced to wear a horklut (‘whore kerchief’), also called a horluva (‘whore cap’), on their heads – to mark their crime and their low social position (Frykman 1977). From the latter part of the nineteenth century up until today, public

in Exposed
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

? Håkan Juholt (HJ): It was constantly for a while, it came and went for a while. But I never noticed that they disappeared completely, so from October to January there was always someone there. I: That’s quite a few months. HJ: Yes, there was always someone. Sometimes there were many, sometimes only a few photographers. I: From October to January? HJ: Yes, there was always someone in the stairwell, always someone outside. I: In the stairwell? HJ: In the stairwell. In the beginning they rang the doorbell pretty regularly, but I think it was SÄPO [the Swedish

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Sequence and the rise of auteurism in 1950s Britain
Erik Hedling

extraordinaire and the notion of the authored art film. Sweden had Ingmar Bergman, Italy had, for instance, Fellini, Rossellini, Visconti, and Antonioni, France had the Cahiers du Cinéma generation, towards the end of decade represented by the breakthrough of the nouvelle vague , with Truffaut, Godard, Rohmer and Chabrol. Traditionally, Britain has been said to have missed out on the development of auteurism

in British cinema of the 1950s
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Mia-Marie Hammarlin

’s effects in the form of exclusion and public shaming. When an unusual experience such as this one becomes more common, it will probably also become less threatening. At the same time, the functions for preservation on the global Internet mean that it becomes increasingly difficult for scandalised people to begin anew, to be given a second chance. In the digital era scandals are stickier than ever, being virtually impossible to wash off. In addition, it is possible to discern a certain satiety in the Swedish audiences, at least when it comes to political scandals. It

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Woman in a Dressing Gown
Melanie Williams

able to identify with the characters, and explains how the character of Amy has meant something to women all over the world: ‘Argentinian, German, Swedish, Dutch and British women have told me that they “know Amy”, that a woman like this lives “next door” or “along the road”.’ 21 However, the women’s recognition of Amy is not personal identification but outward identification; she is not like them

in British cinema of the 1950s
Basil Glynn

) described the potential profitability of Henry’s global stardom when he declared that he remains ‘a subject for the world market’, 26 and in the case of the TV series he was right. It ‘was sold to countries as diverse as Japan, Australia, Canada, Sweden, Finland, Belgium and West Germany, and was bought by the CBS network which broadcast it on American television’. 27 To underscore this global popularity, it is worth

in The British monarchy on screen