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The restructuring of work in Britain
Louise Amoore

. UNDP statistics show that the UK has among the highest levels of functional illiteracy in the OECD countries. The UK level of functional illiteracy is calculated at 21.8 per cent of all 16–65 year-olds, a level that compares to 20.7 per cent in the US, 14.4 per cent in Germany, 7.5 per cent in Sweden and 29.5 per cent in the Russian Federation (UNDP, 2000: 172). The blurring of the boundaries between secure and contingent work has also resulted in a gendered ‘functional flexibility’ that finds women providing contract services for cleaning, catering and domestic

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
The bridge, the fund and insurance in Dar es Salaam
Irmelin Joelsson

. ( 2015 ). Governing by debt . South Pasadena : Semiotext(e) . Lindell , I. , Nordström , J. and Byerley , A. ( 2016 ). New city visions and the politics of redevelopment in Dar es Salaam . Uppsala, Sweden : Nordiska Afrikainstitutet . Lobo-Guerrero , L. ( 2011 ). Insuring

in African cities and collaborative futures
The restructuring of work in Germany
Louise Amoore

’ (Mahnkopf, 1999: 161). However, the industrial relations debate in Germany has not taken the form of Anglo-Saxon hyperflexibility in which trade unions are constrained in their activities and removed from many workplaces. In contrast to this Table 4.2 Standardised rates of unemployment (as % of civilian labour force) Canada France Germany Netherlands New Zealand Sweden UK US OECD EU 1997 1998 1999 2000 19.1 12.3 19.9 15.2 16.6 19.9 17.0 14.9 17.2 10.6 18.3 11.8 19.3 14.1 17.5 18.3 16.3 14.5 17.1 19.9 17.6 11.2 18.6 13.3 16.8 17.2 16.1 14.2 16.8 19.2 16.8 19.5 17

in Globalisation contested
Louise Amoore

’ (1997: 7-8). These countries are directly identified as converging around the OECD Jobs Strategy blueprint for labour flexibility. By contrast, Germany, France, Belgium, Denmark and Sweden, among others, are criticised for their structural impediments to wage flexibility, their high levels of social transfers, and their use of active labour market policies: ‘It remains an open question whether a policy approach that sees public intervention in post-compulsory education, training and active labour market policies as a substitute for relative wage flexibility is

in Globalisation contested