Social welfare for the twenty-first century

Social democracy has made a political comeback in recent years, especially under the influence of the ‘Third Way’. Not everyone is convinced, however, that ‘Third Way’ social democracy is the best means of reviving the Left's project. This book considers this dissent and offers an alternative approach. Bringing together a range of social and political theories, it engages with some contemporary debates regarding the present direction and future of the Left. Drawing upon egalitarian, feminist and environmental ideas, the book proposes that the social democratic tradition can be renewed but only if the dominance of conservative ideas is challenged more effectively. It explores a number of issues with this aim in mind, including justice, the state, democracy, new technologies, future generations and the advances in genetics.

Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

which may qualify for the label – principally in the USA, Netherlands and Germany, as well as several countries in the Southern Hemisphere (Gledhill, 2001), especially New Zealand – it is in the UK that the NSD, and associated terms such as the ‘Third Way’, have been applied most often and most consistently.2,3 Of course, this solution is not ideal, as it might be said that, as with any ideology, the NSD has no pure form, for even within New Labour the influence of old social democracy has still been visible. So for our purposes the first question we need to ask

in After the new social democracy
An introduction to the book
Colin Coulter

of capital to the supposed benevolence of civil society and the state.12 It is this particular desire to reconcile the private and the public, apparently in the interests of all, that underlies the politics of the ‘third way’. Although he is willing to acknowledge its failings, it becomes readily apparent that Giddens regards capitalism as having rather more strengths than weaknesses.13 In his recent writings, the various ways in which forms of capitalist practice operate to connect people who live large distances apart – what is often termed ‘globalisation’ – are

in The end of Irish history?
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

to ensure an end-state egalitarianism. This then explains why New Labour is committed to equal opportunities, social markets, education, employment and social inclusion. Although Buckler’s interpretation of Rawls is occasionally shaky – tending to regard him as a prototypical Third Wayer – he does show that New Labour’s is at best a weak egalitarianism (cf. Wissenburg, 2001). What of reciprocity? More than anyone, Stuart White (1999, 2001) has established how and why the New Labour project holds to the basic prin- TZP2 4/25/2005 4:50 PM Page 37 Justice and

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
Universalism and the Jewish question
Robert Fine
and
Philip Spencer

other makes an ‘ism’ of the nation as the only means of escaping an otherwise ineluctable antisemitism. Both bear witness to the immense contradiction under these conditions between recognising our unity with others and our separate existence. Cosmopolitanism offers itself as an attractive third way for Jews living in an antisemitic world, but this ‘ism’ contains its own pitfalls: not only that of aloofness as a cosmopolitan world citizen from one's particular

in Antisemitism and the left
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

fragmentations of market economics. Associative democracy is therefore something of a middle way between state socialism and market capitalism, but one that, unlike the Third Way, does not remain complacent about the social detritus that the market revolution has left in its wake. Its purpose is to re-empower by bringing the spaces of economic and social production and consumption as close together as feasibly possible. It could represent a more creative interface between the parliamentary and the non-parliamentary by not confusing the former with state collectivism or the

in After the new social democracy