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Juvenile actors and humanitarian sentiment in the 1940s
Michael Lawrence

This chapter examines specific ideological and aesthetic dimensions of the representation of children in American films produced during and directly after the Second World War in relation to the promotion and operations of the United Nations. 1 It addresses how pitiable and vulnerable children from the world’s warzones – specifically groups of orphaned, abandoned and injured children from

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

international affairs than the other. This manifests itself in institutions such as the United Nations General Assembly where each state has one vote. Secondly, for a state to achieve full external sovereignty it must be recognised as a fellow sovereign state by ‘enough’ of the other members of the international system, especially the most powerful states. For example, the apartheid regime in South Africa set up and recognised a

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Open Access (free)
Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

with the outbreak of the Second World War did not destroy liberal support for internationalism. Liberals have been vigorous in their support for the United Nations since its foundation in 1945. They are the most enthusiastic supporters of wholehearted commitment by Britain to the European Union and its project for European integration. This internationalism springs from the liberal belief in free trade and from the assumption

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Open Access (free)
Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

was popular among liberals and some socialists during the early nineteenth century. After the First World War it was resurrected in the institution of the League of Nations, founded on the principles of national self-determination and collective security. After the Second World War this form of nationalism was embodied in the United Nations and other liberal international bodies set up to regulate human rights and the free

in Understanding political ideas and movements
New stories on rafted ice
Elana Wilson Rowe

; Young, 1992, 1998). The development and ratification, by most Arctic states, of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) in 1982 was also another key milestone for the legal harmonisation of interests amongst the Arctic coastal states (Harders, 1987). At a recent Arctic conference, the Norwegian Foreign Minister Børge Brende described UNCLOS as the ‘Constitution of the Arctic’ (Nilsen, 2017). Gerhardt et al. (2010) suggest that the key legacy of UNCLOS is the definition of various zones of ocean space (exclusive economic zones close to the coast

in Arctic governance
Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

importance of upholding individual rights as a defence against the might of totalitarian regimes. Thus the post-war period was notable for a plethora of proclamations of ‘rights’. Human rights were espoused by the Vatican and adopted by the United Nations. Even the British, suspicious of legalistic positive rights, eventually incorporated the European Convention on Human Rights into law. The UK was the first to sign

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Open Access (free)
Their basis and limits
Catriona McKinnon

-obligation holders – as is the case with United Nations (UN) Declaration of Human Rights – the expectations of putative rights-holders will be inflamed and disappointed: ‘The perspective of rights provides a perilous way of formulating ethical requirements since it leaves many possible obligations dangling in the air.’ 17 O’Neill claims that the priority given to obligations in Kantian approaches avoids this

in Political concepts
Open Access (free)
A power perspective on Arctic governance
Elana Wilson Rowe

the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of Parties in Paris in 2015, one could argue that the edge of an umbrella Arctic policy field, greatly concerned with regional climate change, has yet to extend its policy field boundaries to the global climate policy field. By contrast, dealing with the global challenge of persistent organic pollutants, actors within the Arctic policy field have indeed exerted substantial and coordinated influence (Leonard and Fenge, 2003; Selin, 2017), which would indicate strongly overlapping

in Arctic governance
Elana Wilson Rowe

, powerful, indigenous collective and individual voices calling for justice and equality (Abele and Rodon, 2009). The ICC was pushed forward by a complex set of North American domestic and international factors, and quickly became an important actor within a burgeoning indigenous internationalism taking place in international organisations, such as the United Nations (Smith and Wilson, 2009; Shadian, 2014, 2017). Within the Nordic Arctic, the Saami had for decades become increasingly organised because of internal push factors and also international processes, such as the

in Arctic governance
Open Access (free)
Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

disintegration of Yugoslavia throughout the 1990s. It remains a major principle in international law and politics. States are recognised as sovereign legal entities in international society. This is a very important principle on which international law and international institutions, such as the European Union and the United Nations, rest. The UN General Assembly, for example, enshrines this legal equality in the principle of ‘one state

in Understanding political ideas and movements