Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 66 items for :

  • "United States" x
  • Manchester Political Studies x
Clear All
Open Access (free)

transboundary pollutants; and opening up new areas for cooperation, such as the recent Central Arctic Ocean fisheries treaty. The continued engagement of the United States and Russia in regional politics as both active and ‘resting’ great powers is, in other words, essential for maintaining and expanding cooperation. Global politics today is marked by enduring, seemingly unresolvable strife and suffering in regional wars and proxy wars; a growing preoccupation with putting domestic politics ‘first’; and a populist backlash against expert knowledge, including against the

in Arctic governance
The United States Peace Corps in the early 1960s

The United States Peace Corps captured the public’s imagination in a way that few international development initiatives ever did. Presidential candidate John F. Kennedy first uttered the words ‘Peace Corps’ in early November 1960; two months later, a Gallup poll found that 89 per cent of Americans had heard of the Peace Corps, with 71 per cent in favour. 1 Over the following years, the Peace

in Global humanitarianism and media culture

more fulsome discourse of civilisations that Duara points to. Concerns over the ‘progress’ of Japanese civilisation that circulated in the public writings of Tokutomi were shared by the author of the next perspective –​ heterodox Protestant Uchimura Kanzo. Some comparison of the two can help clarify the power of Uchimura’s point of view. Both had negative experiences of life in the United States and were focused on trans-​Pacific relations. Japan’s seizure of Taiwan and Korea and the annexation of Samoa, Guam and the Philippines by the United States enlarged the

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Ontologies of connection, reconstruction of memory

, inter-​imperial competition and ‘noble savage’ representation took the place of inter-​cultural curiosity. For the second new-​ world zone, Western colonialism was going to be a multinational affair that included Russians and Germans as late imperialists, as well as the United States in its colonial experiments. The British and French entered as the most expansive and experienced imperial powers. Imperial integration of the Pacific and linkages with other world regions only began in the late eighteenth century, even though voyages of exploration had begun 250 years

in Debating civilisations
New stories on rafted ice

from the nearby oil and gas development at Prudhoe Bay failed. As attention to the whales’ plight and the villagers’ efforts grew, national resources were brought in to cope, with whale biologists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency lending assistance. Eventually, the issue went international. The United States State Department contacted the Soviet Union to secure the cooperation of two icebreakers stationed in the Russian Far East –​the Admiral Makarov and the Vladimir Arseniev. Over the course of several days, Soviet icebreakers rammed the tough ridge

in Arctic governance

: membership in a polity is a necessary condition for human autonomy and well-being” (p. 40). Defined narrowly as participation in democratic self-government at the level of states, this seems both empirically doubtful and possibly condescending to the many individuals who live self-fulfilled, post-political lives. In the United States, for example, many people have checked themselves out of the political process, and for good reason. The level of

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
Theorising Arctic hierarchies

of public goods were provided by the United States and the Soviet Union in their respective spheres of influence. In the post-​ Cold War period, the question of whether the USA can act as a fully global hegemon in delivering global public goods is actively debated. At the same time, US dominance in the international system has not been replaced by another power, however unevenly enacted or contested this American hegemonic position has become. This incomplete/​partial hegemony thus ties back into broader debates discussed in the introduction to this volume about

in Arctic governance

more forceful diversification of worldly articulations than Robertson allows for. Globality as consciousness looks more like a shifting terrain of different projects of globalisation that continue to imbue places with special meaning. Europe, the United States and Japan are three large projects with which to begin (Inglis, 2010). Robertson is not unaware of this, as evidenced in his elaboration of Japanese globality (Robertson, 58 58 Debating civilisations 1992: 85–​96). But the world appears, in the final instance, a received singular order for him, not one made

in Debating civilisations

devoted to broader geopolitical tension also matches the United States’ official reports and strategies relating to the Arctic. Though the USA ranked sovereignty and security as its top priority in its 2013 strategy, it characterised the Arctic region as ‘free of conflict’ and elaborated on the need ‘to seek to work with other states and Arctic entities to advance common objectives in the Arctic region in a manner that protects Arctic states’ (Obama, 2013: 6, 10). Here, we see various kinds of diplomatic work in framing the region as cooperative, from oblique reference

in Arctic governance

church was enough to indicate to them the invalidity of his entire theological and organisational claims. 5 When in 1670 the archbishop of Mexico failed to lower the train of his robe in the presence of the viceroy, the gesture was deemed to threaten and was intended to threaten viceregal authority and that of the Spanish colonial regime. 6 In 2012 the reported burning of copies of the Koran by United States troops led to riots and death in Afghanistan. 7 During the French Revolution the allegation that royalist troops had trampled on tricolour cockades was a

in Cultivating political and public identity